Unusual case of subarachnoid haemorrhage in patient with Fabry's disease

Case report and literature review

Michael T. Cormican, Thanasis Paschalis, Angela Viers, Cargill Herley Alleyne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fabry's disease is a rare, X linked recessive disease affecting 1 in 40 000 persons. The symptoms result from a lack of or a non-functioning enzyme α galactosidase, which leads to globotriaosylceramide accumulation in the walls of blood vessels. Mortality is generally from cardiac or renal complications and death from subarachnoid haemorrhage is distinctly rare. The authors report a man with Fabry's disease who died after subarachnoid haemorrhage from a progressively enlarging fusiform basilar aneurysm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBMJ Case Reports
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

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Fabry Disease
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Galactosidases
Aneurysm
Blood Vessels
Kidney
Mortality
Enzymes
globotriaosylceramide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Unusual case of subarachnoid haemorrhage in patient with Fabry's disease : Case report and literature review. / Cormican, Michael T.; Paschalis, Thanasis; Viers, Angela; Alleyne, Cargill Herley.

In: BMJ Case Reports, 01.01.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cormican, Michael T. ; Paschalis, Thanasis ; Viers, Angela ; Alleyne, Cargill Herley. / Unusual case of subarachnoid haemorrhage in patient with Fabry's disease : Case report and literature review. In: BMJ Case Reports. 2012.
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