Urinary bladder tumor markers

Vinata B Lokeshwar, Marie G. Selzer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bladder cancer is amenable to biomarker development because many tumor-associated molecules are secreted in urine. Tumor cells are shed in urine, and, therefore, tests that detect tumor cell-surface markers have also been developed to diagnose bladder cancer and monitor its recurrence. Several bladder tumor markers show higher sensitivity than cytology, but most have lower specificity. In addition to markers that use conventional technologies such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, point-of-care devices, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, fluorescent in situ hybridization, and immunocytochemistry, proteomic and gene profiling approaches are being used to find new biomarkers to assist in the molecular profiling of bladder cancer. This review describes both new and well-studied bladder tumor markers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)528-537
Number of pages10
JournalUrologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

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Tumor Biomarkers
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Urinary Bladder
Biomarkers
Point-of-Care Systems
Urine
Neoplasms
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
Proteomics
Cell Biology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Immunohistochemistry
Technology
Recurrence
Equipment and Supplies
Genes

Keywords

  • Bladder cancer
  • Diagnosis
  • Surveillance
  • Tumor markers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Urology

Cite this

Urinary bladder tumor markers. / Lokeshwar, Vinata B; Selzer, Marie G.

In: Urologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations, Vol. 24, No. 6, 01.11.2006, p. 528-537.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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