Urinary prostasin excretion is associated with adiposity in nonhypertensive African-American adolescents

De Huang Guo, Samip J. Parikh, Julie Chao, Norman K. Pollock, Xiaoling Wang, Harold Snieder, Gerjan Navis, James G. Wilson, Jigar Bhagatwala, Haidong Zhu, Yanbin Dong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Metabolic abnormalities in obesity can overstimulate the renal epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and subsequently lead to blood pressure (BP) elevation. Prostasin, a membrane-bound/secretive serine protease, is thought to activate ENaC via the proteolytic cleavage of the channel. Our specific aim was to explore whether there is a relationship between adiposity and urinary prostasin excretion at the population level.Methods: In 271 African-American adolescents, urinary prostasin concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and normalized by urinary creatinine.Results: Urinary prostasin excretion increased in the overweight/obese group (n = 110, 38.2 ± 4.0 ng/mg) vs. the normal-weight group (n = 161, 20.7 ± 1.2 ng/mg, P = 0.03). Urinary prostasin excretion was significantly correlated with BMI percentiles (r = 0.14, P = 0.02), waist circumference (r = 0.13, P = 0.05), total body fat mass (r = 0.20, P < 0.01), and percentage body fat (r = 0.23, P < 0.01). Urinary prostasin excretion was also correlated with plasma aldosterone (r = 0.11, P = 0.05) and systolic BP (SBP; r = 0.15, P = 0.02), but the significances disappeared after adjustment of any of the adiposity variables.Conclusion: Our data for the first time suggest that adiposity plays a role in urinary prostasin excretion, and its associations with aldosterone and BP appear to be modulated by adiposity. Whether urinary prostasin excretion is a biomarker/mechanism underlying obesity-related hypertension deserves further investigations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-210
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric research
Volume74
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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