Use of a repetitive mouse B2 element to identify transplanted mouse cells in mouse-chick chimeras

Roni Jacob Bollag, Kimberly B. Crawford, Harriett Stadt, Donna Kumiski, Marzena Zdanowicz, Carlos Baptista, Vlad Herlea, Margaret L. Kirby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Monitoring the migrations of cells during embryonic development requires a system in which cells can be identified in situ during-locomotion. One promising system involves the generation of chimeras by transplanting mouse cells into chick embryos in ovo to exploit the wealth of mouse genetic variants. The success of this technique relies on the ability to detect individual mouse cells in a chick environment with high specificity. The murine B2 family of short interspersed elements is present in the mouse genome at copy numbers in excess of 105, whereas this sequence is absent in the chick genome based on hybridization techniques. This differential of five orders of magnitude produces signals in mouse cells that are easily identified, even in an environment that is predominantly chick. Thus, the B2 repeat probe is highly effective for the purpose of identifying mouse cells in mouse-chick chimeras.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-78
Number of pages4
JournalExperimental Cell Research
Volume248
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 10 1999

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Genome
Chick Embryo
Locomotion
Embryonic Development
Cell Movement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Bollag, R. J., Crawford, K. B., Stadt, H., Kumiski, D., Zdanowicz, M., Baptista, C., ... Kirby, M. L. (1999). Use of a repetitive mouse B2 element to identify transplanted mouse cells in mouse-chick chimeras. Experimental Cell Research, 248(1), 75-78. https://doi.org/10.1006/excr.1999.4401

Use of a repetitive mouse B2 element to identify transplanted mouse cells in mouse-chick chimeras. / Bollag, Roni Jacob; Crawford, Kimberly B.; Stadt, Harriett; Kumiski, Donna; Zdanowicz, Marzena; Baptista, Carlos; Herlea, Vlad; Kirby, Margaret L.

In: Experimental Cell Research, Vol. 248, No. 1, 10.04.1999, p. 75-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bollag, RJ, Crawford, KB, Stadt, H, Kumiski, D, Zdanowicz, M, Baptista, C, Herlea, V & Kirby, ML 1999, 'Use of a repetitive mouse B2 element to identify transplanted mouse cells in mouse-chick chimeras', Experimental Cell Research, vol. 248, no. 1, pp. 75-78. https://doi.org/10.1006/excr.1999.4401
Bollag, Roni Jacob ; Crawford, Kimberly B. ; Stadt, Harriett ; Kumiski, Donna ; Zdanowicz, Marzena ; Baptista, Carlos ; Herlea, Vlad ; Kirby, Margaret L. / Use of a repetitive mouse B2 element to identify transplanted mouse cells in mouse-chick chimeras. In: Experimental Cell Research. 1999 ; Vol. 248, No. 1. pp. 75-78.
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