Vascular changes in DOCA Hypertension

Influence of a Low protein Diet

Robert S. Moreland, R Clinton Webb, David F. Bohr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The goal of this study was to characterize the influence of a low protein d iet on vascular changes induced by deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) hypertension. DOCA hypertensive and control normotensive rats were placed on a low protein (5%) diet for 4 weeks. This intervention blocked the further increase in systolic blood pressure of rats treated with DOCA; systolic blood pressures of control rats were not influenced by the low protein diet. The sensitivity of isolated mesenteric arteries to norepinephrine was increased in DOCA hypertensive rats compared to that in arteries from control rats; arterial strips from rats maintained on the low protein diet were less sensitive to the catecholamine than arteries from their respective control diet group. Vascular sensitivity to calcium was identical in both normotensive and DOCA hypertensive rats, and the low protein diet had no effect on this measure of calcium activation. Calcium-induced relaxation was depressed in arteries from DOCA hypertensive rats, suggesting a decreased stabilizing influence of the cation on the excitable membrane. Arteries from rats maintained on the low protein diet showed enhanced relaxation to calcium compared to those from their respective control diet group. Membrane stores of calcium available for activation by norepinephrine were increased in arteries from DOCA hypertensive rats; the low protein diet decreased the storage capacity of these membrane sites. The total protein content of the aorta was increased in DOCA hypertensive rats and depressed to control level in DOCA rats maintained on low protein diet. No change was observed in actomyosin content nor in the aclinto- myosin ratio during the DOCA hypertension or the addition of a low protein diet. Since one action of DOCA is to increase cellular protein synthesis, the attenuation of these vascular changes in DOCA rats maintained on a protein-deficient diet is probably due to a decrease in available substrate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-107
Number of pages9
JournalHypertension
Volume4
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 1982
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Desoxycorticosterone
Protein-Restricted Diet
Blood Vessels
Acetates
Hypertension
Arteries
Calcium
Blood Pressure
Diet
Membranes
Norepinephrine
Proteins
Actomyosin
Control Groups
Mesenteric Arteries
Myosins
Catecholamines
Aorta
Cations

Keywords

  • Actomyosin
  • Calcium stabilization
  • Smooth muscle sensitivity
  • Sodium flux

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Vascular changes in DOCA Hypertension : Influence of a Low protein Diet. / Moreland, Robert S.; Webb, R Clinton; Bohr, David F.

In: Hypertension, Vol. 4, No. 5, 01.01.1982, p. 99-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moreland, RS, Webb, RC & Bohr, DF 1982, 'Vascular changes in DOCA Hypertension: Influence of a Low protein Diet', Hypertension, vol. 4, no. 5, pp. 99-107.
Moreland, Robert S. ; Webb, R Clinton ; Bohr, David F. / Vascular changes in DOCA Hypertension : Influence of a Low protein Diet. In: Hypertension. 1982 ; Vol. 4, No. 5. pp. 99-107.
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