Venogenic impotence. Diagnosis, management, and results

R. W. Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Veno-occlusion has been clearly established as a necessary phase of the erectile cycle. Surgery directed at eliminating some of the draining veins has been performed since 1981 as a type of treatment for male erectile dysfunction. Abnormal venous drainage due to excessive pathologic venous outflow or congenital abnormalities is rare. Veno-occlusive dysfunction can be secondary to poor arterial inflow or decreased compliance of corporal sinus tissue. Cavernosometry and cavernosography reports describe an amazing consistency of ability to diagnose corporal veno-occlusive dysfunction. Yet, surgery directed at eliminating veins above the tunica albuginea give long-term improvement, including the ability to convert some patients to pharmacologic injection therapeutic treatment, in only 50-70% of the patients. Improved diagnostic techniques will further delineate a relative small group of patients who might benefit from current veno-occlusive dysfunction surgery. Despite this, a group of patients do benefit long-term from veno-occlusive dysfunction surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)567-576
Number of pages10
JournalProblems in Urology
Volume5
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

Fingerprint

Vasculogenic Impotence
Aptitude
Veins
Erectile Dysfunction
Compliance
Drainage
Therapeutics
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Venogenic impotence. Diagnosis, management, and results. / Lewis, R. W.

In: Problems in Urology, Vol. 5, No. 4, 01.01.1991, p. 567-576.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lewis, R. W. / Venogenic impotence. Diagnosis, management, and results. In: Problems in Urology. 1991 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 567-576.
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