Vertebrate phylogeny of hydrogen sulfide vasoactivity

Ryan A. Dombkowski, Michael J. Russell, Alexis A. Schulman, Meredith M. Doellman, Kenneth R. Olson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

90 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a recently identified endogenous vasodilator in mammals. In steelhead/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Osteichthyes), H2S produces both dose-dependent dilation and a unique dose-dependent constriction. In this study, we examined H2S vasoactivity in all vertebrate classes to determine whether H2S is universally vasoactive and to identify phylogenetic and/or environmental trends. H2S was generated from NaHS and examined in unstimulated and precontracted systemic and, when applicable, pulmonary arteries (PA) from Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stouti, Agnatha), sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus, Agnatha), sandbar shark (Carcharhinus milberti, Chondrichthyes), marine toad (Bufo marinus, Amphibia), American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis, Reptilia), Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus, Aves), and white rat (Rattus rattus, Mammalia). In otherwise unstimulated vessels, NaHS produced 1) a dose-dependent relaxation in Pacific hagfish dorsal aorta; 2) a dose-dependent contraction in sea lamprey dorsal aorta, marine toad aorta, alligator aorta and PA, duck aorta, and rat thoracic aorta; 3) a threshold relaxation in shark ventral aorta, dorsal aorta, and afferent branchial artery; and 4) a multiphasic contraction-relaxation-contraction in the marine toad PA, duck PA, and rat PA. Precontraction of these vessels with another agonist did not affect the general pattern of NaHS vasoactivity with the exception of the rat aorta, where relaxation was now dominant. These results show that H2S is a phylogenetically ancient and versatile vasoregulatory molecule that appears to have been opportunistically engaged to suit both organ-specific and species-specific homeostatic requirements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)R243-R252
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume288
Issue number1 57-1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

Hydrogen Sulfide
Phylogeny
Aorta
Vertebrates
Bufo marinus
Pulmonary Artery
Petromyzon
Alligators and Crocodiles
Ducks
Oncorhynchus mykiss
Hagfishes
Sharks
Mammals
Reptiles
Amphibians
Thoracic Aorta
Vasodilator Agents
Constriction
Birds
Dilatation

Keywords

  • Amphibian
  • Bird
  • Cardiovascular
  • Evolution
  • Fish
  • Mammal
  • Reptile

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Dombkowski, R. A., Russell, M. J., Schulman, A. A., Doellman, M. M., & Olson, K. R. (2005). Vertebrate phylogeny of hydrogen sulfide vasoactivity. American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 288(1 57-1), R243-R252. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpregu.00324.2004

Vertebrate phylogeny of hydrogen sulfide vasoactivity. / Dombkowski, Ryan A.; Russell, Michael J.; Schulman, Alexis A.; Doellman, Meredith M.; Olson, Kenneth R.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 288, No. 1 57-1, 01.01.2005, p. R243-R252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dombkowski, Ryan A. ; Russell, Michael J. ; Schulman, Alexis A. ; Doellman, Meredith M. ; Olson, Kenneth R. / Vertebrate phylogeny of hydrogen sulfide vasoactivity. In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology. 2005 ; Vol. 288, No. 1 57-1. pp. R243-R252.
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