Visceral adipose tissue and markers of the insulin resistance syndrome in obese black and white teenagers

Scott Owens, Bernard Gutin, Paule Barbeau, Mark Litaker, Jerry David Allison, Matthew Humphries, Tomoki Okuyama, Ngoc Anh Le

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine the relationships between visceral and general adiposity, cardiovascular fitness, and markers of the insulin resistance syndrome in obese black and white teenagers. Research Methods and Procedures: Cross-sectional survey of 81 obese 13-to 16-year-old youths. Visceral adipose tissue was measured with magnetic resonance imaging, and percentage body fat was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Cardiovascular fitness was assessed with a submaximal treadmill test. Fasting blood samples were analyzed for lipids/lipoproteins and insulin. Resting blood pressure was obtained using an automated cuff. Results: Visceral adipose tissue was significantly correlated with unfavorable levels of: triacylglycerol (r = 0.27, p < 0.05), total cholesterol (r = 0.27, p < 0.05), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = -0.26, p < 0.05), the ratio of total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = 0.42, p < 0.01), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = 0.27, p < 0.05), apolipoprotein B (r = 0.38, p < 0.01), and systolic blood pressure (r = 0.30, p < 0.01). Multiple regression analyses revealed that visceral adipose tissue was more powerful than percentage body fat for explaining variance in lipoproteins (e.g., for the ratio of total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, r2 = 0.13, p < 0.01, and for systolic blood pressure, r2 = 0.07, p < 0.05). Ethnicity was the most powerful of the demographic predictors for blood lipids (r2 = 0.15 for triacylglycerol with lower levels in blacks; r2 = 0.10 for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with higher levels in blacks; r2 = 0.06 for the ratio of total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with lower levels in blacks). Cardiovascular fitness was not retained as a significant predictor of markers of the insulin resistance syndrome. Discussion: Some of the deleterious relationships between visceral adiposity and markers for the insulin resistance syndrome seen in adults were already present in these obese young people.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-293
Number of pages7
JournalObesity Research
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Keywords

  • Insulin resistance syndrome
  • Teenagers
  • Visceral adipose tissue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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    Owens, S., Gutin, B., Barbeau, P., Litaker, M., Allison, J. D., Humphries, M., Okuyama, T., & Le, N. A. (2000). Visceral adipose tissue and markers of the insulin resistance syndrome in obese black and white teenagers. Obesity Research, 8(4), 287-293. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2000.34