2D and 3D high resolution gradient echo functional imaging of the brain

Venous contributions to signal in motor cortex studies

E. M. Haacke, A. Hopkins, S. Lai, Peter F Buckley, L. Friedman, H. Meltzer, P. Hedera, R. Friedland, S. Klein, L. Thompson, D. Detterman, J. Tkach, J. S. Lewin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

139 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent emphasis on high resolution gradient echo studies in functional imaging has led to the conclusion that there are likely three domains of response to the blood circulation in the brain when considering field inhomogeneity effects of the venous blood pre‐ and during activation. The first is a coherent effect due to large or macroscopic vessels on the order of the size of the voxel (ca 200–500 μm in most studies). These can lead to very large signal changes (up to 100%). The second is at the venule level (ca 50–200 μm) and is associated with smaller parenchymal changes (usually ca 10% or less). The third is at the capillary level and is associated with much smaller signal changes at 1.5T and even up to 4 T. The actual signal changes depend on field strength and sequence design. In this paper, we present our experience in detecting the first two domains with 2D and 3D gradient echo imaging at 1.5T. We find that high resolution enables visualization of the larger small veins in motor cortex studies and that, on occasion, it is possible to see the venule effects as well. We suggest a simple model to explain the large signal changes based on susceptibility changes and partial volume effects. Comparisons of the functional imaging data to this model and to MR angiographic studies are also shown as evidence of the venous sources of the susceptibility changes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-62
Number of pages9
JournalNMR in Biomedicine
Volume7
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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Functional Neuroimaging
Venules
Motor Cortex
Brain
Imaging techniques
Blood Circulation
Veins
Hemodynamics
Blood
Visualization
Chemical activation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Spectroscopy

Cite this

Haacke, E. M., Hopkins, A., Lai, S., Buckley, P. F., Friedman, L., Meltzer, H., ... Lewin, J. S. (1994). 2D and 3D high resolution gradient echo functional imaging of the brain: Venous contributions to signal in motor cortex studies. NMR in Biomedicine, 7(1-2), 54-62. https://doi.org/10.1002/nbm.1940070109

2D and 3D high resolution gradient echo functional imaging of the brain : Venous contributions to signal in motor cortex studies. / Haacke, E. M.; Hopkins, A.; Lai, S.; Buckley, Peter F; Friedman, L.; Meltzer, H.; Hedera, P.; Friedland, R.; Klein, S.; Thompson, L.; Detterman, D.; Tkach, J.; Lewin, J. S.

In: NMR in Biomedicine, Vol. 7, No. 1-2, 01.01.1994, p. 54-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haacke, EM, Hopkins, A, Lai, S, Buckley, PF, Friedman, L, Meltzer, H, Hedera, P, Friedland, R, Klein, S, Thompson, L, Detterman, D, Tkach, J & Lewin, JS 1994, '2D and 3D high resolution gradient echo functional imaging of the brain: Venous contributions to signal in motor cortex studies', NMR in Biomedicine, vol. 7, no. 1-2, pp. 54-62. https://doi.org/10.1002/nbm.1940070109
Haacke, E. M. ; Hopkins, A. ; Lai, S. ; Buckley, Peter F ; Friedman, L. ; Meltzer, H. ; Hedera, P. ; Friedland, R. ; Klein, S. ; Thompson, L. ; Detterman, D. ; Tkach, J. ; Lewin, J. S. / 2D and 3D high resolution gradient echo functional imaging of the brain : Venous contributions to signal in motor cortex studies. In: NMR in Biomedicine. 1994 ; Vol. 7, No. 1-2. pp. 54-62.
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