A comprehensive evaluation of motion sensor step-counting error

Mark G. Abel, Nicole Rachael Peritore, Robert Shapiro, David R. Mullineaux, Kelly Rodriguez, James C. Hannon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the effect that walking speed, gender, leg length, motion sensor tilt angle, brand, and placement have on motion sensor step-counting error. Fifty-nine participants performed treadmill walking trials at 6 speeds while wearing 5 motion sensor brands placed on the anterior (Digiwalker, DW; Walk4Life, WFL; New Lifestyles, NL; Omron, OM), midaxillary (DW; WFL; NL; ActiGraph, AG), and posterior (DW, WFL, NL) aspects of the waistline. The anterior-placed NL and midaxillary-placed AG were the most accurate motion sensors. Motion sensor step-count error tended to decrease at faster walking speeds, with lesser tilt angles, and with an anterior waistline placement. Gender and leg length had no effect on motion sensor step-count error. We conclude that the NL and AG yielded the most accurate step counts at a range of walking speeds in individuals with different physical characteristics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)166-170
Number of pages5
JournalApplied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

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Leg
Walking
Life Style
Walking Speed

Keywords

  • Accelerometer
  • Measurement
  • Motion sensor
  • Pedometer
  • Walking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Abel, M. G., Peritore, N. R., Shapiro, R., Mullineaux, D. R., Rodriguez, K., & Hannon, J. C. (2011). A comprehensive evaluation of motion sensor step-counting error. Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, 36(1), 166-170. https://doi.org/10.1139/H10-095

A comprehensive evaluation of motion sensor step-counting error. / Abel, Mark G.; Peritore, Nicole Rachael; Shapiro, Robert; Mullineaux, David R.; Rodriguez, Kelly; Hannon, James C.

In: Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.02.2011, p. 166-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abel, MG, Peritore, NR, Shapiro, R, Mullineaux, DR, Rodriguez, K & Hannon, JC 2011, 'A comprehensive evaluation of motion sensor step-counting error', Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 166-170. https://doi.org/10.1139/H10-095
Abel, Mark G. ; Peritore, Nicole Rachael ; Shapiro, Robert ; Mullineaux, David R. ; Rodriguez, Kelly ; Hannon, James C. / A comprehensive evaluation of motion sensor step-counting error. In: Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism. 2011 ; Vol. 36, No. 1. pp. 166-170.
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