A new approach to managing oral manifestations of Sjogren's syndrome and skin manifestations of lupus

Stephen Hsu, Douglas Dickinson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disorder that affects the salivary glands, leading to xerostomia, and the lacrimal glands, resulting in xerophthalmia. Secondary SS is associated with other autoimmune disorders such as systemic rheumatic diseases and systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE), which can affect multiple organs, including the epidermis. Recent studies have demonstrated that green tea polyphenols (GTPs) possess both anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties in normal human cells. Epidemiological evidence has indicated that, in comparison to the United States, the incidence of SS, clinical xerostomia and lupus is considerably lower in China and Japan, the two leading green tea-consuming countries. Thus, GTPs might be responsible, in part, for geographical differences in the incidence of xerostomia by reducing the initiation or severity of SS and lupus. Consistent with this, molecular, cellular and animal studies indicate that GTPs could provide protective effects against autoimmune reactions in salivary glands and skin. Therefore, salivary tissues and epidermal keratinocytes could be primary targets for novel therapies using GTPs. This review article evaluates the currently available research data on GTPs, focusing on their potential application in the treatment of the oral manifestations of SS and skin manifestations of SLE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)229-239
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Volume39
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 15 2006

Fingerprint

Oral Manifestations
Skin Manifestations
Sjogren's Syndrome
Tea
Polyphenols
Skin
Xerostomia
Salivary Glands
Xerophthalmia
Lacrimal Apparatus
Incidence
Rheumatic Diseases
Keratinocytes
Epidermis
China
Japan
Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Cells
Tissue

Keywords

  • Catechins
  • Green tea
  • Lupus
  • Sjogren's syndrome
  • Xerostomia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

A new approach to managing oral manifestations of Sjogren's syndrome and skin manifestations of lupus. / Hsu, Stephen; Dickinson, Douglas.

In: Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Vol. 39, No. 3, 15.06.2006, p. 229-239.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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