A new approach to T-cell activation: Natural and synthetic conjugates capable of activating T cells

D. H. Zimmerman, K. F. Bergmann, K. S. Rosenthal, D. A. Elliott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

T-cell activation and response to antigen follows presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-compatible antigen-presenting cells (APC). Activation requires a number of separate but interrelated receptor-ligand interactions between the T cell and APC. Some of these interactions can be mimicked by other molecules, such as lectins, antibodies, or synthetic peptides. We discuss the potential use of conjugates to activate T cells, and describe a new class of heteroconjugates for stimulation or modulation of antigen-specific T-cell activity. These heteroconjugates contain an antigen-specific epitope coupled to a T-cell ligand, which replaces some functions of the APC. Such heteroconjugates would bind and supply two signals to T cells, one through the antigen-recognition site of the T-cell receptor and the other through receptors required for activation. Natural heteroconjugates of this type have been identified, for example in a small peptide derived from a Mycobacterium leprae protein.1 Coupling of these two signaling moieties into a single soluble molecule may allow antigen-specific T-cell activation without the need for processing and presentation by antigen-presenting cells and without MHC restriction. Conjugates of this type may be useful for the study of T-cell activation, the development of new antigen-specific diagnostic materials and immunomodulators, and possibly a new class of vaccines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-102
Number of pages12
JournalVaccine Research
Volume5
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

T-Lymphocytes
Antigen-Presenting Cells
Antigens
Major Histocompatibility Complex
CD27 Antigens
Ligands
Mycobacterium leprae
Peptides
Viral Tumor Antigens
Antigen Presentation
Immunologic Factors
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Lectins
Epitopes
Vaccines
Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

A new approach to T-cell activation : Natural and synthetic conjugates capable of activating T cells. / Zimmerman, D. H.; Bergmann, K. F.; Rosenthal, K. S.; Elliott, D. A.

In: Vaccine Research, Vol. 5, No. 2, 01.01.1996, p. 91-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zimmerman, D. H. ; Bergmann, K. F. ; Rosenthal, K. S. ; Elliott, D. A. / A new approach to T-cell activation : Natural and synthetic conjugates capable of activating T cells. In: Vaccine Research. 1996 ; Vol. 5, No. 2. pp. 91-102.
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