A new role for Nogo as a regulator of vascular remodeling

Lisette Acevedo, Jun Yu, Hediye Erdjument-Bromage, Robert Qing Miao, Ji Eun Kim, David J Fulton, Paul Tempst, Stephen M. Strittmatter, William C. Sessa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

179 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although Nogo-A has been identified in the central nervous system as an inhibitor of axonal regeneration, the peripheral roles of Nogo isoforms remain virtually unknown. Here, using a proteomic analysis to identify proteins enriched in caveolae and/or lipid rafts (CEM/LR), we show that Nogo-B is highly expressed in cultured endothelial and smooth muscle cells, as well as in intact blood vessels. The N terminus of Nogo-B promotes the migration of endothelial cells but inhibits the migration of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells, processes necessary for vascular remodeling. Vascular injury in Nogo-A/B-deficient mice promotes exaggerated neointimal proliferation, and adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of Nogo-B rescues the abnormal vascular expansion in those knockout mice. Our discovery that Nogo-B is a regulator of vascular homeostasis and remodeling broadens the functional scope of this family of proteins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)382-388
Number of pages7
JournalNature Medicine
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2004

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Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Blood Vessels
Muscle
Cells
Gene transfer
Caveolae
Vascular System Injuries
Endothelial cells
Blood vessels
Neurology
Vascular Smooth Muscle
Knockout Mice
Proteomics
Cell Movement
Regeneration
Protein Isoforms
Proteins
Homeostasis
Central Nervous System
Endothelial Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Acevedo, L., Yu, J., Erdjument-Bromage, H., Miao, R. Q., Kim, J. E., Fulton, D. J., ... Sessa, W. C. (2004). A new role for Nogo as a regulator of vascular remodeling. Nature Medicine, 10(4), 382-388. https://doi.org/10.1038/nm1020

A new role for Nogo as a regulator of vascular remodeling. / Acevedo, Lisette; Yu, Jun; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Miao, Robert Qing; Kim, Ji Eun; Fulton, David J; Tempst, Paul; Strittmatter, Stephen M.; Sessa, William C.

In: Nature Medicine, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.04.2004, p. 382-388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Acevedo, L, Yu, J, Erdjument-Bromage, H, Miao, RQ, Kim, JE, Fulton, DJ, Tempst, P, Strittmatter, SM & Sessa, WC 2004, 'A new role for Nogo as a regulator of vascular remodeling', Nature Medicine, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 382-388. https://doi.org/10.1038/nm1020
Acevedo L, Yu J, Erdjument-Bromage H, Miao RQ, Kim JE, Fulton DJ et al. A new role for Nogo as a regulator of vascular remodeling. Nature Medicine. 2004 Apr 1;10(4):382-388. https://doi.org/10.1038/nm1020
Acevedo, Lisette ; Yu, Jun ; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye ; Miao, Robert Qing ; Kim, Ji Eun ; Fulton, David J ; Tempst, Paul ; Strittmatter, Stephen M. ; Sessa, William C. / A new role for Nogo as a regulator of vascular remodeling. In: Nature Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 10, No. 4. pp. 382-388.
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