A point system as catalyst to increase resident scholarship: An MPCRN study

Dean Seehusen, Christy J.W. Ledford, Scott Grogan, Eugene Kim, Jeremy J. Johnson, Mark E. Stackle, Lloyd A. Runser, Matthew V. Fargo, James W. Keck, Anna L. Oberhofer, Richard Shoemaker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Encouraging resident scholarly activity has been a long-standing challenge for medical educators. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has been increasing its emphasis on scholarly activity, forcing programs to evaluate their existing processes. This study sought to evaluate the impact of a scholarly activity point system on the resident scholarly productivity at multiple programs. METHODS: Five military family medicine residencies evaluated resident out-comes 2 years before and 2 years after the introduction of a scholarly activity point system. Outcome measures included peer-reviewed publications with a resident as first author, peer-reviewed publications with a resident as any author, resident presentation of scholarship at a regional, national, and international conference, IRB-approved protocols with a resident as principal investigator, and IRB-approved protocols with a resident in any role. RESULTS: Four of the five programs experienced substantial increases in nearly every outcome. The fifth program, which had a more robust culture of inquiry at baseline, did not experience an increase in resident scholarly productivity. CONCLUSIONS: A scholarly activity point system was associated with an increase in resident scholarly production in family medicine programs. It appears to work best in programs that start from a lower level of scholarly productivity at baseline. A point system appears to be a useful addition to scholarly activity curricula.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)222-224
Number of pages3
JournalFamily Medicine
Volume49
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Research Ethics Committees
Publications
Military Medicine
Graduate Medical Education
Accreditation
Internship and Residency
Curriculum
Research Personnel
Medicine
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Military Family

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Seehusen, D., Ledford, C. J. W., Grogan, S., Kim, E., Johnson, J. J., Stackle, M. E., ... Shoemaker, R. (2017). A point system as catalyst to increase resident scholarship: An MPCRN study. Family Medicine, 49(3), 222-224.

A point system as catalyst to increase resident scholarship : An MPCRN study. / Seehusen, Dean; Ledford, Christy J.W.; Grogan, Scott; Kim, Eugene; Johnson, Jeremy J.; Stackle, Mark E.; Runser, Lloyd A.; Fargo, Matthew V.; Keck, James W.; Oberhofer, Anna L.; Shoemaker, Richard.

In: Family Medicine, Vol. 49, No. 3, 01.03.2017, p. 222-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seehusen, D, Ledford, CJW, Grogan, S, Kim, E, Johnson, JJ, Stackle, ME, Runser, LA, Fargo, MV, Keck, JW, Oberhofer, AL & Shoemaker, R 2017, 'A point system as catalyst to increase resident scholarship: An MPCRN study', Family Medicine, vol. 49, no. 3, pp. 222-224.
Seehusen D, Ledford CJW, Grogan S, Kim E, Johnson JJ, Stackle ME et al. A point system as catalyst to increase resident scholarship: An MPCRN study. Family Medicine. 2017 Mar 1;49(3):222-224.
Seehusen, Dean ; Ledford, Christy J.W. ; Grogan, Scott ; Kim, Eugene ; Johnson, Jeremy J. ; Stackle, Mark E. ; Runser, Lloyd A. ; Fargo, Matthew V. ; Keck, James W. ; Oberhofer, Anna L. ; Shoemaker, Richard. / A point system as catalyst to increase resident scholarship : An MPCRN study. In: Family Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 49, No. 3. pp. 222-224.
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