A Qualitative Exploration of Rural African American Youth Perceptions about the Effect of Dating Violence on Sexual Health

Tanya A. Montoya, Dionne Smith Coker-Appiah, Eugenia Eng, Mysha R. Wynn, Tiffany G. Townsend

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Adolescent dating violence (ADV) remains a significant concern, particularly among rural African Americans. Few studies have explored adolescents' perceptions about the link between ADV and sexual health and none have targeted this population. Employing qualitative methods based in Community-Based Participatory Research and theory, this study explored rural African American adolescents' knowledge, perceptions and beliefs about the impact of ADV on sexual health. Secondary data analysis of 20 semi-structured individual interviews, conducted with older adolescents (aged 18-21), revealed participants understood the link between ADV and sexual health consequences, specifically as it related to STI and HIV prevention, condom use, and refusal of sex; and the negative impact refusing sex, communicating about HIV and other STI prevention, and negotiating condom use can have on ADV. This included: (a) negative relationship outcomes, including ADV and fear; and (b) factors that impact one's ability to refuse sex, communicate about HIV and STI prevention, and negotiate condom use. Findings underscore the need for comprehensive ADV prevention programs for rural African Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-62
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Reproductive Health
African Americans
violence
adolescent
health
Condoms
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
HIV
Community-Based Participatory Research
Intimate Partner Violence
American
Aptitude
health consequences
Negotiating
secondary analysis
qualitative method
Fear
data analysis
Interviews
anxiety

Keywords

  • Adolescent dating violence
  • African-American
  • Community-based participatory research (CBPR)
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Rural
  • Sexual health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

A Qualitative Exploration of Rural African American Youth Perceptions about the Effect of Dating Violence on Sexual Health. / Montoya, Tanya A.; Coker-Appiah, Dionne Smith; Eng, Eugenia; Wynn, Mysha R.; Townsend, Tiffany G.

In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, Vol. 22, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 48-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Montoya, Tanya A. ; Coker-Appiah, Dionne Smith ; Eng, Eugenia ; Wynn, Mysha R. ; Townsend, Tiffany G. / A Qualitative Exploration of Rural African American Youth Perceptions about the Effect of Dating Violence on Sexual Health. In: Journal of Child and Family Studies. 2013 ; Vol. 22, No. 1. pp. 48-62.
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