A survey of Oregon emergency physicians to assess mandatory reporting knowledge and reporting patterns regarding intoxicated drivers in the state of Oregon

John G. McManus, Nathan D. Magaret, Jerris R. Hedges, Nicolas B. Rayner, Matthew Rice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To assess emergency physician reporting patterns in Oregon before and after the passage of a mandatory intoxicated driving reporting law. Methods: A one-page survey was mailed to 504 emergency physicians in Oregon in April 2004. Data on reporting frequency were collected using a four-point ordinal scale regarding motor vehicle crash-involved drivers (MIDs) and intoxicated persons attempting to drive away from the emergency department (DAEDs). Paired observations were assessed for a stated increase in reporting activity following passage of the law using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Associations of postlaw reporting and demographic and knowledge factors were sought using Spearman rank correlation analysis. Results: Of the 504 surveys mailed, 298 (59%) were adequate for analysis. Many respondents (57%) were already aware of the law. Most (92%) agreed that physicians should be mandated to report some crimes. MIDs were always reported by 18% of physicians before the law and by 47% afterward, whereas DAEDs were always reported by 56% of physicians before the law and by 69% afterward. Emergency medicine-trained physicians, higher emergency department census, and increased years of experience were associated with a significantly higher increase in reporting pattern after passage of the law for both MIDs and DAEDs. Conclusions: Although 44% of responding emergency physicians in Oregon were unaware of a mandated reporting law for intoxicated drivers presenting to the ED, most physicians stated an increase in their reporting practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)896-899
Number of pages4
JournalAcademic Emergency Medicine
Volume12
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005

Fingerprint

Mandatory Reporting
Emergencies
Physicians
Hospital Emergency Service
Motor Vehicles
Surveys and Questionnaires
Emergency Medicine
Censuses
Crime
Nonparametric Statistics
Research Design
Demography

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • DUI
  • Driving
  • Intoxication
  • Mandatory reporting
  • Survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

A survey of Oregon emergency physicians to assess mandatory reporting knowledge and reporting patterns regarding intoxicated drivers in the state of Oregon. / McManus, John G.; Magaret, Nathan D.; Hedges, Jerris R.; Rayner, Nicolas B.; Rice, Matthew.

In: Academic Emergency Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 9, 01.09.2005, p. 896-899.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c3034bf62fe5401aace6ceb4113743f3,
title = "A survey of Oregon emergency physicians to assess mandatory reporting knowledge and reporting patterns regarding intoxicated drivers in the state of Oregon",
abstract = "Objectives: To assess emergency physician reporting patterns in Oregon before and after the passage of a mandatory intoxicated driving reporting law. Methods: A one-page survey was mailed to 504 emergency physicians in Oregon in April 2004. Data on reporting frequency were collected using a four-point ordinal scale regarding motor vehicle crash-involved drivers (MIDs) and intoxicated persons attempting to drive away from the emergency department (DAEDs). Paired observations were assessed for a stated increase in reporting activity following passage of the law using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Associations of postlaw reporting and demographic and knowledge factors were sought using Spearman rank correlation analysis. Results: Of the 504 surveys mailed, 298 (59{\%}) were adequate for analysis. Many respondents (57{\%}) were already aware of the law. Most (92{\%}) agreed that physicians should be mandated to report some crimes. MIDs were always reported by 18{\%} of physicians before the law and by 47{\%} afterward, whereas DAEDs were always reported by 56{\%} of physicians before the law and by 69{\%} afterward. Emergency medicine-trained physicians, higher emergency department census, and increased years of experience were associated with a significantly higher increase in reporting pattern after passage of the law for both MIDs and DAEDs. Conclusions: Although 44{\%} of responding emergency physicians in Oregon were unaware of a mandated reporting law for intoxicated drivers presenting to the ED, most physicians stated an increase in their reporting practice.",
keywords = "Alcohol, DUI, Driving, Intoxication, Mandatory reporting, Survey",
author = "McManus, {John G.} and Magaret, {Nathan D.} and Hedges, {Jerris R.} and Rayner, {Nicolas B.} and Matthew Rice",
year = "2005",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1197/j.aem.2005.04.023",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "896--899",
journal = "Academic Emergency Medicine",
issn = "1069-6563",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A survey of Oregon emergency physicians to assess mandatory reporting knowledge and reporting patterns regarding intoxicated drivers in the state of Oregon

AU - McManus, John G.

AU - Magaret, Nathan D.

AU - Hedges, Jerris R.

AU - Rayner, Nicolas B.

AU - Rice, Matthew

PY - 2005/9/1

Y1 - 2005/9/1

N2 - Objectives: To assess emergency physician reporting patterns in Oregon before and after the passage of a mandatory intoxicated driving reporting law. Methods: A one-page survey was mailed to 504 emergency physicians in Oregon in April 2004. Data on reporting frequency were collected using a four-point ordinal scale regarding motor vehicle crash-involved drivers (MIDs) and intoxicated persons attempting to drive away from the emergency department (DAEDs). Paired observations were assessed for a stated increase in reporting activity following passage of the law using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Associations of postlaw reporting and demographic and knowledge factors were sought using Spearman rank correlation analysis. Results: Of the 504 surveys mailed, 298 (59%) were adequate for analysis. Many respondents (57%) were already aware of the law. Most (92%) agreed that physicians should be mandated to report some crimes. MIDs were always reported by 18% of physicians before the law and by 47% afterward, whereas DAEDs were always reported by 56% of physicians before the law and by 69% afterward. Emergency medicine-trained physicians, higher emergency department census, and increased years of experience were associated with a significantly higher increase in reporting pattern after passage of the law for both MIDs and DAEDs. Conclusions: Although 44% of responding emergency physicians in Oregon were unaware of a mandated reporting law for intoxicated drivers presenting to the ED, most physicians stated an increase in their reporting practice.

AB - Objectives: To assess emergency physician reporting patterns in Oregon before and after the passage of a mandatory intoxicated driving reporting law. Methods: A one-page survey was mailed to 504 emergency physicians in Oregon in April 2004. Data on reporting frequency were collected using a four-point ordinal scale regarding motor vehicle crash-involved drivers (MIDs) and intoxicated persons attempting to drive away from the emergency department (DAEDs). Paired observations were assessed for a stated increase in reporting activity following passage of the law using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Associations of postlaw reporting and demographic and knowledge factors were sought using Spearman rank correlation analysis. Results: Of the 504 surveys mailed, 298 (59%) were adequate for analysis. Many respondents (57%) were already aware of the law. Most (92%) agreed that physicians should be mandated to report some crimes. MIDs were always reported by 18% of physicians before the law and by 47% afterward, whereas DAEDs were always reported by 56% of physicians before the law and by 69% afterward. Emergency medicine-trained physicians, higher emergency department census, and increased years of experience were associated with a significantly higher increase in reporting pattern after passage of the law for both MIDs and DAEDs. Conclusions: Although 44% of responding emergency physicians in Oregon were unaware of a mandated reporting law for intoxicated drivers presenting to the ED, most physicians stated an increase in their reporting practice.

KW - Alcohol

KW - DUI

KW - Driving

KW - Intoxication

KW - Mandatory reporting

KW - Survey

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=23944457163&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=23944457163&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1197/j.aem.2005.04.023

DO - 10.1197/j.aem.2005.04.023

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 896

EP - 899

JO - Academic Emergency Medicine

JF - Academic Emergency Medicine

SN - 1069-6563

IS - 9

ER -