A trial of 3 interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening in African Americans

Daniel S. Blumenthal, Selina A. Smith, Charlye D. Majett, Ernest Alema-Mensah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. CRC incidence and mortality rates are higher among blacks than among whites, and screening rates are lower in blacks than in whites. For the current study, the authors tested 3 interventions that were intended to increase the rate of CRC screening among African Americans. METHODS: The following interventions were chosen to address evidence gaps in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Guide to Community Preventive Services: one-on-one education, group education, and reducing out-of-pocket costs. Three hundred sixty-nine African-American men and women aged ≥50 years were enrolled in this randomized, controlled community intervention trial. The main outcome measures were postintervention increase in CRC knowledge and obtaining a screening test within 6 months. RESULTS: There was substantial attrition: Two hundred fifty-seven participants completed the intervention and were available for follow-up 3 months to 6 months later. Among completers, there were significant increases in knowledge in both educational cohorts but in neither of the other 2 cohorts. By the 6-month follow-up, 17.7% (11 of 62 participants) of the Control cohort reported having undergone screening compared with 33.9% (22 of 65 participants) of the Group Education cohort (P = .039). Screening rate increases in the other 2 cohorts were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: The current results indicated that group education could increase CRC cancer screening rates among African Americans. The screening rate of <35% in a group of individuals who participated in an educational program through multiple sessions over a period of several weeks indicated that there still are barriers to overcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)922-929
Number of pages8
JournalCancer
Volume116
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2010

Fingerprint

Early Detection of Cancer
African Americans
Colorectal Neoplasms
Education
Social Welfare
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Health Expenditures
Cause of Death
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Mortality
Incidence
Neoplasms
hydroquinone

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Community-based participatory research
  • Health education
  • Health status disparities
  • Minority health
  • Screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Blumenthal, D. S., Smith, S. A., Majett, C. D., & Alema-Mensah, E. (2010). A trial of 3 interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening in African Americans. Cancer, 116(4), 922-929. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.24842

A trial of 3 interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening in African Americans. / Blumenthal, Daniel S.; Smith, Selina A.; Majett, Charlye D.; Alema-Mensah, Ernest.

In: Cancer, Vol. 116, No. 4, 15.02.2010, p. 922-929.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blumenthal, DS, Smith, SA, Majett, CD & Alema-Mensah, E 2010, 'A trial of 3 interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening in African Americans', Cancer, vol. 116, no. 4, pp. 922-929. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.24842
Blumenthal DS, Smith SA, Majett CD, Alema-Mensah E. A trial of 3 interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening in African Americans. Cancer. 2010 Feb 15;116(4):922-929. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.24842
Blumenthal, Daniel S. ; Smith, Selina A. ; Majett, Charlye D. ; Alema-Mensah, Ernest. / A trial of 3 interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening in African Americans. In: Cancer. 2010 ; Vol. 116, No. 4. pp. 922-929.
@article{e54ac4aec17940658699fdaef53d4bb4,
title = "A trial of 3 interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening in African Americans",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. CRC incidence and mortality rates are higher among blacks than among whites, and screening rates are lower in blacks than in whites. For the current study, the authors tested 3 interventions that were intended to increase the rate of CRC screening among African Americans. METHODS: The following interventions were chosen to address evidence gaps in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Guide to Community Preventive Services: one-on-one education, group education, and reducing out-of-pocket costs. Three hundred sixty-nine African-American men and women aged ≥50 years were enrolled in this randomized, controlled community intervention trial. The main outcome measures were postintervention increase in CRC knowledge and obtaining a screening test within 6 months. RESULTS: There was substantial attrition: Two hundred fifty-seven participants completed the intervention and were available for follow-up 3 months to 6 months later. Among completers, there were significant increases in knowledge in both educational cohorts but in neither of the other 2 cohorts. By the 6-month follow-up, 17.7{\%} (11 of 62 participants) of the Control cohort reported having undergone screening compared with 33.9{\%} (22 of 65 participants) of the Group Education cohort (P = .039). Screening rate increases in the other 2 cohorts were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: The current results indicated that group education could increase CRC cancer screening rates among African Americans. The screening rate of <35{\%} in a group of individuals who participated in an educational program through multiple sessions over a period of several weeks indicated that there still are barriers to overcome.",
keywords = "Colorectal cancer, Community-based participatory research, Health education, Health status disparities, Minority health, Screening",
author = "Blumenthal, {Daniel S.} and Smith, {Selina A.} and Majett, {Charlye D.} and Ernest Alema-Mensah",
year = "2010",
month = "2",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1002/cncr.24842",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "116",
pages = "922--929",
journal = "Cancer",
issn = "0008-543X",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A trial of 3 interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening in African Americans

AU - Blumenthal, Daniel S.

AU - Smith, Selina A.

AU - Majett, Charlye D.

AU - Alema-Mensah, Ernest

PY - 2010/2/15

Y1 - 2010/2/15

N2 - BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. CRC incidence and mortality rates are higher among blacks than among whites, and screening rates are lower in blacks than in whites. For the current study, the authors tested 3 interventions that were intended to increase the rate of CRC screening among African Americans. METHODS: The following interventions were chosen to address evidence gaps in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Guide to Community Preventive Services: one-on-one education, group education, and reducing out-of-pocket costs. Three hundred sixty-nine African-American men and women aged ≥50 years were enrolled in this randomized, controlled community intervention trial. The main outcome measures were postintervention increase in CRC knowledge and obtaining a screening test within 6 months. RESULTS: There was substantial attrition: Two hundred fifty-seven participants completed the intervention and were available for follow-up 3 months to 6 months later. Among completers, there were significant increases in knowledge in both educational cohorts but in neither of the other 2 cohorts. By the 6-month follow-up, 17.7% (11 of 62 participants) of the Control cohort reported having undergone screening compared with 33.9% (22 of 65 participants) of the Group Education cohort (P = .039). Screening rate increases in the other 2 cohorts were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: The current results indicated that group education could increase CRC cancer screening rates among African Americans. The screening rate of <35% in a group of individuals who participated in an educational program through multiple sessions over a period of several weeks indicated that there still are barriers to overcome.

AB - BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. CRC incidence and mortality rates are higher among blacks than among whites, and screening rates are lower in blacks than in whites. For the current study, the authors tested 3 interventions that were intended to increase the rate of CRC screening among African Americans. METHODS: The following interventions were chosen to address evidence gaps in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Guide to Community Preventive Services: one-on-one education, group education, and reducing out-of-pocket costs. Three hundred sixty-nine African-American men and women aged ≥50 years were enrolled in this randomized, controlled community intervention trial. The main outcome measures were postintervention increase in CRC knowledge and obtaining a screening test within 6 months. RESULTS: There was substantial attrition: Two hundred fifty-seven participants completed the intervention and were available for follow-up 3 months to 6 months later. Among completers, there were significant increases in knowledge in both educational cohorts but in neither of the other 2 cohorts. By the 6-month follow-up, 17.7% (11 of 62 participants) of the Control cohort reported having undergone screening compared with 33.9% (22 of 65 participants) of the Group Education cohort (P = .039). Screening rate increases in the other 2 cohorts were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: The current results indicated that group education could increase CRC cancer screening rates among African Americans. The screening rate of <35% in a group of individuals who participated in an educational program through multiple sessions over a period of several weeks indicated that there still are barriers to overcome.

KW - Colorectal cancer

KW - Community-based participatory research

KW - Health education

KW - Health status disparities

KW - Minority health

KW - Screening

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=76249111565&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=76249111565&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/cncr.24842

DO - 10.1002/cncr.24842

M3 - Article

VL - 116

SP - 922

EP - 929

JO - Cancer

JF - Cancer

SN - 0008-543X

IS - 4

ER -