Accuracy and precision of as-received implant torque wrenches

Eduardo Britton-Vidal, Philip S Baker, Donald Mettenburg, Darshanjit Singh Pannu, Stephen Warwick Looney, Jimmy Londono, Frederick Rueggeberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Statement of problem Previous implant torque evaluation did not determine if the target value fell within a confidence interval for the population mean of the test groups, disallowing determination of wheter a specific type of wrench met a standardized goal value. Purpose The purpose of this study was to measure both the accuracy and precision of 2 different configurations (spring style and peak break) of as-received implant torque wrenches and compare the measured values to manufacturer-stated values. Material and methods Ten wrenches from 4 manufacturers, representing a variety of torque-limiting mechanisms and specificity of use (with either a specific brand or universally with any brand of implant product). Drivers were placed into the wrench, and tightening torque was applied to reach predetermined values using a NIST-calibrated digital torque wrench. Five replications of measurement were made for each wrench and averaged to provide a single value from that instrument. The target torque value for each wrench brand was compared to the 95% confidence interval for the true population mean of measured values to see if it fell within the measured range. Results Only 1 wrench brand (Nobel Biocare) demonstrated the target torque value falling within the 95% confidence interval for the true population mean. For others, the targeted torque value fell above the 95% confidence interval (Straumann and Imtec) or below (Salvin Torq). Conclusions Neither type of torque-limiting mechanism nor designation of a wrench to be used as a dedicated brand-only product or to be used as a universal product on many brands affected the ability of a wrench to deliver torque values where the true population mean included the target torque level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)811-816
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Prosthetic Dentistry
Volume112
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Torque
Confidence Intervals
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oral Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Accuracy and precision of as-received implant torque wrenches. / Britton-Vidal, Eduardo; Baker, Philip S; Mettenburg, Donald; Pannu, Darshanjit Singh; Looney, Stephen Warwick; Londono, Jimmy; Rueggeberg, Frederick.

In: Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, Vol. 112, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 811-816.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Statement of problem Previous implant torque evaluation did not determine if the target value fell within a confidence interval for the population mean of the test groups, disallowing determination of wheter a specific type of wrench met a standardized goal value. Purpose The purpose of this study was to measure both the accuracy and precision of 2 different configurations (spring style and peak break) of as-received implant torque wrenches and compare the measured values to manufacturer-stated values. Material and methods Ten wrenches from 4 manufacturers, representing a variety of torque-limiting mechanisms and specificity of use (with either a specific brand or universally with any brand of implant product). Drivers were placed into the wrench, and tightening torque was applied to reach predetermined values using a NIST-calibrated digital torque wrench. Five replications of measurement were made for each wrench and averaged to provide a single value from that instrument. The target torque value for each wrench brand was compared to the 95{\%} confidence interval for the true population mean of measured values to see if it fell within the measured range. Results Only 1 wrench brand (Nobel Biocare) demonstrated the target torque value falling within the 95{\%} confidence interval for the true population mean. For others, the targeted torque value fell above the 95{\%} confidence interval (Straumann and Imtec) or below (Salvin Torq). Conclusions Neither type of torque-limiting mechanism nor designation of a wrench to be used as a dedicated brand-only product or to be used as a universal product on many brands affected the ability of a wrench to deliver torque values where the true population mean included the target torque level.",
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AU - Londono, Jimmy

AU - Rueggeberg, Frederick

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