Actigraphy: Analyzing patient movement

Mary Jo Grap, Virginia A. Hamilton, Ann McNallen, Jessica McKinney Ketchum, Al M. Best, Nyimas Y. Isti Arief, Paul A. Wetzel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Actigraphic data during simulated participant movements were evaluated to differentiate among patient behavior states. Methods: Arm and leg actigraphic data were collected on 30 volunteers who simulated 3 behavioral states (calm, restless, agitated) for 10 minutes; counts of observed participant movements (head, torso, extremities) were documented. Results: The mean age of participants was 34.7 years, and 60% were female. Average movement was significantly different among the states (P < .0001; calm [mean = .48], restless [mean = 2.16], agitated [mean = 3.75]). Mean actigraphic measures were significantly different among states for both arm (P < .0001; calm [mean = 6.8], restless [mean = 28.5], agitated [mean = 52.6]) and leg (P < .0001; calm [mean = 3.5], restless [mean = 18.7], agitated [mean = 37.7]). Conclusion: Distinct levels of behavioral states were successfully simulated. Actigraphic data can provide an objective indicator of patient activity over a variety of behavioral states, and these data may offer a standard for comparison among these states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHeart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

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Actigraphy
Leg
Arm
Torso
Head Movements
Volunteers
Extremities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Grap, M. J., Hamilton, V. A., McNallen, A., Ketchum, J. M., Best, A. M., Isti Arief, N. Y., & Wetzel, P. A. (2011). Actigraphy: Analyzing patient movement. Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care, 40(3). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hrtlng.2009.12.013

Actigraphy : Analyzing patient movement. / Grap, Mary Jo; Hamilton, Virginia A.; McNallen, Ann; Ketchum, Jessica McKinney; Best, Al M.; Isti Arief, Nyimas Y.; Wetzel, Paul A.

In: Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care, Vol. 40, No. 3, 01.05.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grap, MJ, Hamilton, VA, McNallen, A, Ketchum, JM, Best, AM, Isti Arief, NY & Wetzel, PA 2011, 'Actigraphy: Analyzing patient movement', Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care, vol. 40, no. 3. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hrtlng.2009.12.013
Grap MJ, Hamilton VA, McNallen A, Ketchum JM, Best AM, Isti Arief NY et al. Actigraphy: Analyzing patient movement. Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care. 2011 May 1;40(3). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hrtlng.2009.12.013
Grap, Mary Jo ; Hamilton, Virginia A. ; McNallen, Ann ; Ketchum, Jessica McKinney ; Best, Al M. ; Isti Arief, Nyimas Y. ; Wetzel, Paul A. / Actigraphy : Analyzing patient movement. In: Heart and Lung: Journal of Acute and Critical Care. 2011 ; Vol. 40, No. 3.
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