Acute aerobic exercise differentially alters acylated ghrelin and perceived fullness in normal-weight and obese individuals

Timothy D. Heden, Ying Liu, Youngmin Park, Kevin C. Dellsperger, Jill A. Kanaley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Heden TD, Liu Y, Park Y, Dellsperger KC, Kanaley JA. Acute aerobic exercise differentially alters acylated ghrelin and perceived fullness in normal-weight and obese individuals. J Appl Physiol 115: 680-687, 2013. First published July 11, 2013; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00515.2013.-Adiposity alters acylated ghrelin concentrations, but it is unknown whether adiposity alters the effect of exercise and feeding on acylated ghrelin responses. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether adiposity [normal-weight (NW) vs. obese (Ob)] influences the effect of exercise and feeding on acylated ghrelin, hunger, and fullness. Fourteen NW and 14 Ob individuals completed two trials in a randomized counterbalanced fashion, including a prior exercise trial (EX) and a no exercise trial (NoEX). During the EX trial, the participants performed 1 h of treadmill walking (55-60% peak O2 uptake) during the evening, 12 h before a 4-h standardized mixed meal test. Frequent blood samples were taken and analyzed for acylated ghrelin, and a visual analog scale was used to assess perceived hunger and fullness. In NW individuals, EX, compared with NoEX, reduced fasting acylated ghrelin concentrations by 18% (P = 0.03), and, in response to feeding, the change in acylated ghrelin (P = 0.02) was attenuated by 39%, but perceived hunger and fullness were unaltered. In Ob individuals, despite no changes in fasting or postprandial acylated ghrelin concentrations with EX, postprandial fullness was attenuated by 46% compared with NoEX (P = 0.05). In summary, exercise performed the night before a meal suppresses acylated ghrelin concentrations in NW individuals without altering perceived hunger or fullness. In Ob individuals, despite no changes in acylated ghrelin concentrations, EX reduced the fullness response to the test meal. Acylated ghrelin and perceived fullness responses are differently altered by acute aerobic exercise in NW and Ob individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)680-687
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume115
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ghrelin
Exercise
Weights and Measures
Hunger
Adiposity
Meals
Fasting
Visual Analog Scale
Walking

Keywords

  • Fullness
  • Gut hormone
  • Hunger
  • Walking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Acute aerobic exercise differentially alters acylated ghrelin and perceived fullness in normal-weight and obese individuals. / Heden, Timothy D.; Liu, Ying; Park, Youngmin; Dellsperger, Kevin C.; Kanaley, Jill A.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 115, No. 5, 01.09.2013, p. 680-687.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Heden, Timothy D. ; Liu, Ying ; Park, Youngmin ; Dellsperger, Kevin C. ; Kanaley, Jill A. / Acute aerobic exercise differentially alters acylated ghrelin and perceived fullness in normal-weight and obese individuals. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2013 ; Vol. 115, No. 5. pp. 680-687.
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