Adverse Childhood Experiences as Predictors of Differences in Intimate Justice, Conflict, Control, and Power in Intimate Relationships

Naomi J. Wheeler, Ryan G. Carlson, Waleed Y. Sami, Christopher Hipp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) predict a higher likelihood of victimization and perpetration of intimate partner violence (IPV). Yet, less is known for the role of ACE in development of intimate partner power and control dynamics such as the types of violence/violence severity experienced or attitudes about equality, fairness, and caring in an intimate relationship. In the current study, we analyzed data from 332 adults enrolled in a community-based relationship education program (52.7% Hispanic, 80.7% female, and 44.3% unemployed). We conducted a mediation analysis to examine differences by indicators of power, control, and equity in respondent’s current or most recent intimate relationship by ACE score. We found psychological distress fully mediated the relationship between ACE and physical and reactive aggression, and partially mediated the relationship between ACE, psychological and controlling aggression, relationship conflict, responsible caring, and ethical power. Implications for practice include: recommendations for screening and risk assessment and more understanding for the role of ACE as a predictor of victimization/perpetration among an understudied demographic – predominately Hispanic women with moderate to low income.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Family Violence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adverse Childhood Experiences: Relationship Education: Intimate Partner Violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Law

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