Aldosterone contributes to elevated left ventricular mass in black boys

Diana G. Murro, Melinda Beavers, Gregory A. Harshfield, Gaston K. Kapuku

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) poses a great risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in adults and may pose a serious risk in children. Adult studies have shown that renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) levels directly correlate with left ventricular mass index (LVMI). The purpose of this study is to explore race- and sex-related effects of the RAAS on LVMI in adolescents. Methods: Data were collected from a sample of 89 blacks (44 girls, 45 boys) and 102 whites (40 girls, 62 boys) aged 15-19. Data collected included sex, age, body mass index (BMI), LVMI, baseline blood pressure, and levels of aldosterone and angiotensin II. Results: In black males, increased aldosterone levels correlated with decreased sodium excretion (r = -0.336, p = 0.024), increased blood pressure (r = 0.358, p = 0.016), and increased LVMI (r = 0.342, p = 0.022). In black females, increased aldosterone levels correlated with increased baseline blood pressure (r = 0.356, p = 0.018). In white males, increased aldosterone correlated with decreased sodium excretion (r = -0.391, p = 0.002). In white females, aldosterone levels correlated with increased baseline blood pressure (r = 0.323, p = 0.042) and decreased sodium excretion (r = -0.342, p = 0.031). Conclusions: The results suggest the following model in black males: increased aldosterone leads to increased sodium retention, causing a volume-mediated increase in blood pressure; increased blood pressure results in increased left ventricular mass, and eventually LVH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)655-660
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Nephrology
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Aldosterone
  • Angiotensin
  • Hypertension
  • Left ventricular hypertrophy
  • Renin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Nephrology

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