Alterations in basal glucose metabolism during late pregnancy in the conscious dog

Cynthia C. Connolly, Linda C. Holste, Lisa N. Aglione, Doss W. Neal, D. Brooks Lacy, Marta S. Smith, Michael Peter Diamond, Alan D. Cherrington, Jean Louis Chiasson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We assessed basal glucose metabolism in 16 female nonpregnant (NP) and 16 late-pregnant (P) conscious, 18-h-fasted dogs that had catheters inserted into the hepatic and portal veins and femoral artery ~17 days before the experiment. Pregnancy resulted in lower arterial plasma insulin (11 ± 1 and 4 ± 1 μU/ml in NP and P, respectively, P < 0.05), but plasma glucose (5.9 ± 0.1 and 5.6 ± 0.1 mg/dl in NP and P, respectively) and glucagon (39 ± 3 and 36 ± 2 pg/ml in NP and P, respectively) were not different. Net hepatic glucose output was greater in pregnancy (42.1 ± 3.1 and 56.7 ± 4.0 μmol·100 g liver-1·min-1 in NP and P, respectively, P 0.05). Total net hepatic gluconeogenic substrate uptake (lactate, alanine, glycerol, and amino acids), a close estimate of the gluconeogenic rate, was not different between the groups (20.6 ± 2.8 and 21.2 ± 1.8 μmol·100 g liver-1·min-1 in NP and P, respectively), indicating that the increment in net hepatic glucose output resulted from an increase in the contribution of glycogenolytically derived glucose. However, total glycogenolysis was not altered in pregnancy. Ketogenesis was enhanced nearly threefold by pregnancy (6.9 ± 1.2 and 18.2 ± 3.4 μmol·100 g liver-1·min-1 in NP and P, respectively), despite equivalent net hepatic nonesterified fatty acid uptake. Thus late pregnancy in the dog is not accompanied by changes in the absolute rates of gluconeogenesis or glycogenolysis. Rather, repartitioning of the glucose released from glycogen is responsible for the increase in hepatic glucose production.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume279
Issue number5 42-5
StatePublished - Dec 12 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Basal Metabolism
Dogs
Glucose
Pregnancy
Liver
Glycogenolysis
Hepatic Veins
Gluconeogenesis
Femoral Artery
Portal Vein
Glucagon
Glycogen
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Alanine
Glycerol
Lactic Acid
Catheters
Insulin
Amino Acids

Keywords

  • Gluconeogenesis
  • Glycogenolysis
  • Hepatic glucose production
  • Ketogenesis
  • Lipolysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Connolly, C. C., Holste, L. C., Aglione, L. N., Neal, D. W., Lacy, D. B., Smith, M. S., ... Chiasson, J. L. (2000). Alterations in basal glucose metabolism during late pregnancy in the conscious dog. American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, 279(5 42-5).

Alterations in basal glucose metabolism during late pregnancy in the conscious dog. / Connolly, Cynthia C.; Holste, Linda C.; Aglione, Lisa N.; Neal, Doss W.; Lacy, D. Brooks; Smith, Marta S.; Diamond, Michael Peter; Cherrington, Alan D.; Chiasson, Jean Louis.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 279, No. 5 42-5, 12.12.2000.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Connolly, CC, Holste, LC, Aglione, LN, Neal, DW, Lacy, DB, Smith, MS, Diamond, MP, Cherrington, AD & Chiasson, JL 2000, 'Alterations in basal glucose metabolism during late pregnancy in the conscious dog', American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 279, no. 5 42-5.
Connolly CC, Holste LC, Aglione LN, Neal DW, Lacy DB, Smith MS et al. Alterations in basal glucose metabolism during late pregnancy in the conscious dog. American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2000 Dec 12;279(5 42-5).
Connolly, Cynthia C. ; Holste, Linda C. ; Aglione, Lisa N. ; Neal, Doss W. ; Lacy, D. Brooks ; Smith, Marta S. ; Diamond, Michael Peter ; Cherrington, Alan D. ; Chiasson, Jean Louis. / Alterations in basal glucose metabolism during late pregnancy in the conscious dog. In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2000 ; Vol. 279, No. 5 42-5.
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abstract = "We assessed basal glucose metabolism in 16 female nonpregnant (NP) and 16 late-pregnant (P) conscious, 18-h-fasted dogs that had catheters inserted into the hepatic and portal veins and femoral artery ~17 days before the experiment. Pregnancy resulted in lower arterial plasma insulin (11 ± 1 and 4 ± 1 μU/ml in NP and P, respectively, P < 0.05), but plasma glucose (5.9 ± 0.1 and 5.6 ± 0.1 mg/dl in NP and P, respectively) and glucagon (39 ± 3 and 36 ± 2 pg/ml in NP and P, respectively) were not different. Net hepatic glucose output was greater in pregnancy (42.1 ± 3.1 and 56.7 ± 4.0 μmol·100 g liver-1·min-1 in NP and P, respectively, P 0.05). Total net hepatic gluconeogenic substrate uptake (lactate, alanine, glycerol, and amino acids), a close estimate of the gluconeogenic rate, was not different between the groups (20.6 ± 2.8 and 21.2 ± 1.8 μmol·100 g liver-1·min-1 in NP and P, respectively), indicating that the increment in net hepatic glucose output resulted from an increase in the contribution of glycogenolytically derived glucose. However, total glycogenolysis was not altered in pregnancy. Ketogenesis was enhanced nearly threefold by pregnancy (6.9 ± 1.2 and 18.2 ± 3.4 μmol·100 g liver-1·min-1 in NP and P, respectively), despite equivalent net hepatic nonesterified fatty acid uptake. Thus late pregnancy in the dog is not accompanied by changes in the absolute rates of gluconeogenesis or glycogenolysis. Rather, repartitioning of the glucose released from glycogen is responsible for the increase in hepatic glucose production.",
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