American thyroid association statement on remote-access thyroid surgery

Eren Berber, Victor Bernet, Thomas J. Fahey, Electron Kebebew, Ashok Shaha, Brendan C. Stack, Michael Stang, David L. Steward, David J. Terris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Remote-access techniques have been described over the recent years as a method of removing the thyroid gland without an incision in the neck. However, there is confusion related to the number of techniques available and the ideal patient selection criteria for a given technique. The aims of this review were to develop a simple classification of these approaches, describe the optimal patient selection criteria, evaluate the outcomes objectively, and define the barriers to adoption. Methods: A review of the literature was performed to identify the described techniques. A simple classification was developed. Technical details, outcomes, and the learning curve were described. Expert opinion consensus was formulated regarding recommendations for patient selection and performance of remote-access thyroid surgery. Results: Remote-access thyroid procedures can be categorized into endoscopic or robotic breast, bilateral axillo-breast, axillary, and facelift approaches. The experience in the United States involves the latter two techniques. The limited data in the literature suggest long operative times, a steep learning curve, and higher costs with remote-access thyroid surgery compared with conventional thyroidectomy. Nevertheless, a consensus was reached that, in appropriate hands, it can be a viable option for patients with unilateral small nodules who wish to avoid a neck incision. Conclusions: Remote-access thyroidectomy has a role in a small group of patients who fit strict selection criteria. These approaches require an additional level of expertise, and therefore should be done by surgeons performing a high volume of thyroid and robotic surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-337
Number of pages7
JournalThyroid
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Patient Selection
Thyroid Gland
Learning Curve
Thyroidectomy
Robotics
Consensus
Breast
Neck
Rhytidoplasty
Confusion
Expert Testimony
Operative Time
Hand
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Berber, E., Bernet, V., Fahey, T. J., Kebebew, E., Shaha, A., Stack, B. C., ... Terris, D. J. (2016). American thyroid association statement on remote-access thyroid surgery. Thyroid, 26(3), 331-337. https://doi.org/10.1089/thy.2015.0407

American thyroid association statement on remote-access thyroid surgery. / Berber, Eren; Bernet, Victor; Fahey, Thomas J.; Kebebew, Electron; Shaha, Ashok; Stack, Brendan C.; Stang, Michael; Steward, David L.; Terris, David J.

In: Thyroid, Vol. 26, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 331-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Berber, E, Bernet, V, Fahey, TJ, Kebebew, E, Shaha, A, Stack, BC, Stang, M, Steward, DL & Terris, DJ 2016, 'American thyroid association statement on remote-access thyroid surgery', Thyroid, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 331-337. https://doi.org/10.1089/thy.2015.0407
Berber E, Bernet V, Fahey TJ, Kebebew E, Shaha A, Stack BC et al. American thyroid association statement on remote-access thyroid surgery. Thyroid. 2016 Mar 1;26(3):331-337. https://doi.org/10.1089/thy.2015.0407
Berber, Eren ; Bernet, Victor ; Fahey, Thomas J. ; Kebebew, Electron ; Shaha, Ashok ; Stack, Brendan C. ; Stang, Michael ; Steward, David L. ; Terris, David J. / American thyroid association statement on remote-access thyroid surgery. In: Thyroid. 2016 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 331-337.
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