An eight month randomized controlled exercise intervention alters resting state synchrony in overweight children

C. E. Krafft, J. E. Pierce, N. F. Schwarz, L. Chi, A. L. Weinberger, D. J. Schaeffer, A. L. Rodrigue, J. Camchong, Jerry David Allison, Nathan Eugene Yanasak, T. Liu, Catherine Lucy Davis, J. E. McDowell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children with low aerobic fitness have altered brain function compared to higher-fit children. This study examined the effect of an 8-month exercise intervention on resting state synchrony. Twenty-two sedentary, overweight (body mass index ≥85th percentile) children 8-11. years old were randomly assigned to one of two after-school programs: aerobic exercise (n= 13) or sedentary attention control (n= 9). Before and after the 8-month programs, all subjects participated in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Independent components analysis identified several networks, with four chosen for between-group analysis: salience, default mode, cognitive control, and motor networks. The default mode, cognitive control, and motor networks showed more spatial refinement over time in the exercise group compared to controls. The motor network showed increased synchrony in the exercise group with the right medial frontal gyrus compared to controls. Exercise behavior may enhance brain development in children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-455
Number of pages11
JournalNeuroscience
Volume256
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 3 2014

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Exercise
Brain
Child Development
Prefrontal Cortex
Body Mass Index
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Aerobic exercise
  • Cognitive control
  • Default mode
  • Development
  • Obesity
  • Resting state fMRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Krafft, C. E., Pierce, J. E., Schwarz, N. F., Chi, L., Weinberger, A. L., Schaeffer, D. J., ... McDowell, J. E. (2014). An eight month randomized controlled exercise intervention alters resting state synchrony in overweight children. Neuroscience, 256, 445-455. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2013.09.052

An eight month randomized controlled exercise intervention alters resting state synchrony in overweight children. / Krafft, C. E.; Pierce, J. E.; Schwarz, N. F.; Chi, L.; Weinberger, A. L.; Schaeffer, D. J.; Rodrigue, A. L.; Camchong, J.; Allison, Jerry David; Yanasak, Nathan Eugene; Liu, T.; Davis, Catherine Lucy; McDowell, J. E.

In: Neuroscience, Vol. 256, 03.01.2014, p. 445-455.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krafft, CE, Pierce, JE, Schwarz, NF, Chi, L, Weinberger, AL, Schaeffer, DJ, Rodrigue, AL, Camchong, J, Allison, JD, Yanasak, NE, Liu, T, Davis, CL & McDowell, JE 2014, 'An eight month randomized controlled exercise intervention alters resting state synchrony in overweight children', Neuroscience, vol. 256, pp. 445-455. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2013.09.052
Krafft, C. E. ; Pierce, J. E. ; Schwarz, N. F. ; Chi, L. ; Weinberger, A. L. ; Schaeffer, D. J. ; Rodrigue, A. L. ; Camchong, J. ; Allison, Jerry David ; Yanasak, Nathan Eugene ; Liu, T. ; Davis, Catherine Lucy ; McDowell, J. E. / An eight month randomized controlled exercise intervention alters resting state synchrony in overweight children. In: Neuroscience. 2014 ; Vol. 256. pp. 445-455.
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