An invertebrate defense molecule activates membrane conductance in mammalian cells by means of its lectin-like domain

Alain Bloc, Rudolf Lucas, Els Van Dijck, Martin Bilej, Yves Dunant, Patrick De Baetselier, Alain Beschin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

The invertebrate defense molecule Coelomic Cytolytic Factor-1 (CCF-1) and the mammalian cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) share a similar lectin-like domain that, upon interaction with specific sugars, causes lysis of African trypanosomes. In contrast to TNF, CCF-1 does not require an acidification of a lysosomal compartment for this activity. Moreover, we could demonstrate using the whole cell patch clamp technique that both TNF and CCF-1 activate amiloride-sensitive channels in mammalian cells, in a TNF receptor-independent way, but, unlike TNF, CCF-1 does not require acidic conditions for this activity. These data confirm the functional analogies of an invertebrate defense molecule and a mammalian cytokine, based on a similar lectin-like interaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-43
Number of pages9
JournalDevelopmental and Comparative Immunology
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Amiloride-sensitive conductance
  • CCF-1
  • Innate immunity
  • Lectin
  • TNF

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Developmental Biology

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