Angiostatic role or astrocytes

Suppression of vascular endothelial cell growth by TGF‐β and other inhibitory factor(s)

M. Ali Behzadian, Xi‐Liang ‐L Wang, Baoen Jiang, Ruth B Caldwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our previous in vivo analyses have suggested that astrocytes play a key role in retinal vascularization by inducing endothelial cell differentiation. Here we demonstrate that medium conditioned by cultured rat brain astrocytes (ACM) contains factors, including transforming growth factor‐β (TGF‐β), that inhibit endothelial cell growth. Serum‐free medium conditioned for 1–3 days was tested on exponentially growing bovine retinal microvascular endothelial, aortic endothelial, mink lung epithelial CCL‐64, and Swiss mouse 3T3 fibroblast cells. The growth of all four cell types was inhibited in a dose and time‐dependent manner. CCL cells, which are used as a model for assaying TGF‐β activity, were more sensitive than the endothelial cells, suggesting that ACM contains TGF‐β. Moreover, acid treatment significantly increased the inhibitory activity of ACM, indicating that TGF‐β in ACM is predominantly in the latent form. Mouse fibroblasts, which are not affected by TGF‐β treatment under the same conditions, were also inhibited by ACM. This suggests that other inhibitory factors in addition to TGF‐β may be involved. Adsorption by an anti‐TGF‐β polyclonal antibody column substantially reduced but did not eliminate the inhibitory activity of ACM for CCL and endothelial cells. Western blot analysis of ACM and proteins eluted from the affinity column revealed a 25 kDa band that co‐migrates with TGF‐β. Comparative densitometry of the 25 kDa bands on Western blot indicated that the amount of TGF‐β in ACM is not sufficient to account for the total growth‐inhibitory activity. These experiments demonstrate directly that rat brain astrocytes express TGF‐β. They also indicate that astrocytes may produce other growth‐inhibitory factor(s) yet to be identified. © 1995 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)480-490
Number of pages11
JournalGlia
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

Transforming Growth Factors
Astrocytes
Endothelial Cells
Growth
Conditioned Culture Medium
Fibroblasts
Western Blotting
Mink
3T3 Cells
Densitometry
Brain
Adsorption
Cell Differentiation
Lung
Acids
Antibodies

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • CNS
  • Retina

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Angiostatic role or astrocytes : Suppression of vascular endothelial cell growth by TGF‐β and other inhibitory factor(s). / Behzadian, M. Ali; Wang, Xi‐Liang ‐L; Jiang, Baoen; Caldwell, Ruth B.

In: Glia, Vol. 15, No. 4, 01.01.1995, p. 480-490.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Behzadian, M. Ali ; Wang, Xi‐Liang ‐L ; Jiang, Baoen ; Caldwell, Ruth B. / Angiostatic role or astrocytes : Suppression of vascular endothelial cell growth by TGF‐β and other inhibitory factor(s). In: Glia. 1995 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 480-490.
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