Are all narratives the same: Convergent and discriminant validity of the Social Cognition and Object Relations Scale—Global Rating Method across two narrative types

Jenelle M. Slavin-Mulford, Luke R. Amerson, Mark J. Hilsenroth, Jennifer Zodan, Jocelyn W. Charnas, Lylli A. Cain, Michelle B. Stein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examines the construct validity of the Social Cognition and Object Relations Scale—Global Rating Method (SCORS-G) by exploring the degree of convergence across different narrative sources (i.e., early memories [EM] and psychotherapy narratives [PT]) using a university-based outpatient sample (n = 101). First, we examined intercorrelations between SCORS-G ratings of EM and PT. Intercorrelations between SCORS-G EM and PT revealed that three of the dimensions significantly correlated with themselves across narrative type (Emotional Investment in Relationships [EIR], Experience and Management of Aggressive Impulses [AGG], and Self-Esteem [SE]), but that only AGG had its strongest correlation with itself (i.e., EM AGG to PT AGG). In addition, EM AGG was significantly related to all but one of the PT SCORS-G dimensions. Likewise, EM SE correlated with all but two of the PT SCORS-G dimensions. Second, we examined how narrative source related to clinical findings. With the use of a multimethod approach, we assessed how SCORS-G ratings from both narrative types correlated with selected variables from the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) and Rorschach Inkblot Test. Findings indicated that there were only three instances in which both narrative types had significant relationships to the same variable/scale, and all three instances were with the Rorschach. Together, these findings suggest that even when using the same scale (SCORS-G), different narrative sources differentially activate aspects of object relations. In addition, the results highlight that difficulties with self-esteem and poor management of aggression in childhood interactions relates to patients' object relational functioning later in life. Clinical implications and future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalClinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • convergence
  • early memories
  • narrative type
  • psychotherapy narratives
  • Social Cognition and Object Relations Scale-Global Rating Method (SCORS-G)
  • validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

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