Association between employment and substance abuse behaviors among public high school adolescents

Robert F. Valois, Ashley C.A. Dunham, Kirby L. Jackson, Jennifer L Waller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To examine the relationship between adolescents' after-school and weekend employment and substance abuse behaviors in a cross-sectional sample of public high school students in South Carolina. Methods: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was used to secure usable data from 4800 subjects. Logistic regression adjusting for age and using SUDAAN were performed. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated from the regression analyses. Results: Thirty percent of white males, 29% of white females, and 20% of black males and females worked at a job for pay during the academic year. For white males employment, ranging from 11 to 15 h and 26 to ≥31 h was associated with cigarette smoking, working from 11 to ≥31 h was associated with alcohol use, working ≥31 h was associated with binge drinking, working from 26 to ≥31 h was associated with marijuana use, and working from 26 to 30 h was associated with cocaine use. For white females, working from 16 to 20 h was associated with alcohol use, working from 21 to 30 h was associated with binge drinking, and working from 26 to 30 h was associated with marijuana and cocaine use. Conclusion: Youth who work above 15 h/week at a job for pay during high school appear to have an increased risk for substance abuse and its consequences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)256-263
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1999

Fingerprint

Substance-Related Disorders
Binge Drinking
Cannabis
Cocaine
Alcohols
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Risk-Taking
Logistic Models
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Confidence Intervals
Students
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Alcohol use
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Cocaine use
  • Employment
  • Gender differences
  • Marijuana use
  • Racial differences
  • Substance abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Association between employment and substance abuse behaviors among public high school adolescents. / Valois, Robert F.; Dunham, Ashley C.A.; Jackson, Kirby L.; Waller, Jennifer L.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.10.1999, p. 256-263.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Valois, Robert F. ; Dunham, Ashley C.A. ; Jackson, Kirby L. ; Waller, Jennifer L. / Association between employment and substance abuse behaviors among public high school adolescents. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 1999 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 256-263.
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