Blunt traumatic bladder rupture

The role of retrograde cystogram

Christina G. Rehm, Anthony J. Mure, Keith F. O'Malley, Steven E. Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study objective: We evaluated the importance of microscopic and gross hematuria and the role of retrograde cystography and computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of blunt traumatic bladder rupture. Design: All cases at a Level I trauma center between January 1, 1986, and March 31, 1989, were reviewed retrospectively. Setting: Level I trauma center, university hospital. Type of participants: All patients with acute blunt abdominal trauma admitted to this Level I trauma center. Interventions: The patients' charts were reviewed with emphasis on mode of diagnosis, treatment, and outcome. Measurements and main results: Twenty-one patients had bladder rupture. All 21 had hematuria with more than 50 RBCs/high-power field, 17 gross and four microscopic. Twenty patients underwent retrograde cystography, which accurately identified bladder rupture, and one was found at laparotomy for other injuries. Seven patients had CT of the abdomen and pelvis, which failed to demonstrate bladder rupture. There were no associated urethral injuries in any of the patients with bladder rupture. Conclusion: Significant (more than 50 RBCs/high-power field) hematuria is the principal indication for evaluation for blunt bladder injury, and retrograde cystography is the diagnostic procedure of choice. CT is neither sensitive nor specific enough as primary diagnostic modality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)845-847
Number of pages3
JournalAnnals of Emergency Medicine
Volume20
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

Fingerprint

Rupture
Urinary Bladder
Trauma Centers
Hematuria
Tomography
Wounds and Injuries
Nonpenetrating Wounds
Pelvis
Abdomen
Laparotomy
Cystography

Keywords

  • bladder, rupture
  • retrograde cystogram, bladder rupture
  • trauma, blunt, bladder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Blunt traumatic bladder rupture : The role of retrograde cystogram. / Rehm, Christina G.; Mure, Anthony J.; O'Malley, Keith F.; Ross, Steven E.

In: Annals of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 20, No. 8, 01.01.1991, p. 845-847.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rehm, Christina G. ; Mure, Anthony J. ; O'Malley, Keith F. ; Ross, Steven E. / Blunt traumatic bladder rupture : The role of retrograde cystogram. In: Annals of Emergency Medicine. 1991 ; Vol. 20, No. 8. pp. 845-847.
@article{cbebeb621e654ea6a004bac51ddd565d,
title = "Blunt traumatic bladder rupture: The role of retrograde cystogram",
abstract = "Study objective: We evaluated the importance of microscopic and gross hematuria and the role of retrograde cystography and computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of blunt traumatic bladder rupture. Design: All cases at a Level I trauma center between January 1, 1986, and March 31, 1989, were reviewed retrospectively. Setting: Level I trauma center, university hospital. Type of participants: All patients with acute blunt abdominal trauma admitted to this Level I trauma center. Interventions: The patients' charts were reviewed with emphasis on mode of diagnosis, treatment, and outcome. Measurements and main results: Twenty-one patients had bladder rupture. All 21 had hematuria with more than 50 RBCs/high-power field, 17 gross and four microscopic. Twenty patients underwent retrograde cystography, which accurately identified bladder rupture, and one was found at laparotomy for other injuries. Seven patients had CT of the abdomen and pelvis, which failed to demonstrate bladder rupture. There were no associated urethral injuries in any of the patients with bladder rupture. Conclusion: Significant (more than 50 RBCs/high-power field) hematuria is the principal indication for evaluation for blunt bladder injury, and retrograde cystography is the diagnostic procedure of choice. CT is neither sensitive nor specific enough as primary diagnostic modality.",
keywords = "bladder, rupture, retrograde cystogram, bladder rupture, trauma, blunt, bladder",
author = "Rehm, {Christina G.} and Mure, {Anthony J.} and O'Malley, {Keith F.} and Ross, {Steven E.}",
year = "1991",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0196-0644(05)81424-6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "845--847",
journal = "Annals of Emergency Medicine",
issn = "0196-0644",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Blunt traumatic bladder rupture

T2 - The role of retrograde cystogram

AU - Rehm, Christina G.

AU - Mure, Anthony J.

AU - O'Malley, Keith F.

AU - Ross, Steven E.

PY - 1991/1/1

Y1 - 1991/1/1

N2 - Study objective: We evaluated the importance of microscopic and gross hematuria and the role of retrograde cystography and computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of blunt traumatic bladder rupture. Design: All cases at a Level I trauma center between January 1, 1986, and March 31, 1989, were reviewed retrospectively. Setting: Level I trauma center, university hospital. Type of participants: All patients with acute blunt abdominal trauma admitted to this Level I trauma center. Interventions: The patients' charts were reviewed with emphasis on mode of diagnosis, treatment, and outcome. Measurements and main results: Twenty-one patients had bladder rupture. All 21 had hematuria with more than 50 RBCs/high-power field, 17 gross and four microscopic. Twenty patients underwent retrograde cystography, which accurately identified bladder rupture, and one was found at laparotomy for other injuries. Seven patients had CT of the abdomen and pelvis, which failed to demonstrate bladder rupture. There were no associated urethral injuries in any of the patients with bladder rupture. Conclusion: Significant (more than 50 RBCs/high-power field) hematuria is the principal indication for evaluation for blunt bladder injury, and retrograde cystography is the diagnostic procedure of choice. CT is neither sensitive nor specific enough as primary diagnostic modality.

AB - Study objective: We evaluated the importance of microscopic and gross hematuria and the role of retrograde cystography and computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of blunt traumatic bladder rupture. Design: All cases at a Level I trauma center between January 1, 1986, and March 31, 1989, were reviewed retrospectively. Setting: Level I trauma center, university hospital. Type of participants: All patients with acute blunt abdominal trauma admitted to this Level I trauma center. Interventions: The patients' charts were reviewed with emphasis on mode of diagnosis, treatment, and outcome. Measurements and main results: Twenty-one patients had bladder rupture. All 21 had hematuria with more than 50 RBCs/high-power field, 17 gross and four microscopic. Twenty patients underwent retrograde cystography, which accurately identified bladder rupture, and one was found at laparotomy for other injuries. Seven patients had CT of the abdomen and pelvis, which failed to demonstrate bladder rupture. There were no associated urethral injuries in any of the patients with bladder rupture. Conclusion: Significant (more than 50 RBCs/high-power field) hematuria is the principal indication for evaluation for blunt bladder injury, and retrograde cystography is the diagnostic procedure of choice. CT is neither sensitive nor specific enough as primary diagnostic modality.

KW - bladder, rupture

KW - retrograde cystogram, bladder rupture

KW - trauma, blunt, bladder

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025875748&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025875748&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0196-0644(05)81424-6

DO - 10.1016/S0196-0644(05)81424-6

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 845

EP - 847

JO - Annals of Emergency Medicine

JF - Annals of Emergency Medicine

SN - 0196-0644

IS - 8

ER -