Calcium Phosphate Phase Transformation Produced by the Interaction of the Portland Cement Component of White Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with a Phosphate-containing Fluid

Franklin R. Tay, David H. Pashley, Frederick A. Rueggeberg, Robert J. Loushine, R. Norman Weller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

169 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The bioactivity of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been attributed to its ability to produce hydroxyapatite in the presence of phosphate-containing fluids. It is known that stoichiometric hydroxyapatites do not exist in biological systems and do not contribute to the osteogenic potential of calcium phosphate-based biomaterials. Because Portland cement is the active ingredient in white MTA, we have characterized the calcium phosphate phases produced when set white Portland cement was immersed in phosphate-buffered saline using pH and turbidity measurements, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy. An amorphous calcium phosphate phase was initially formed that transformed to an apatite phase, with the latter consisting of calcium-deficient, poorly crystalline, B-type carbonated apatite crystallites. Amorphous calcium phosphate is a key intermediate that precedes biological apatite formation in skeletal calcification. Thus, the clinical manifestations of bioactivity with the use of MTA may at least be partially attributed to the mineralization induction capacity of its Portland cement component.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1347-1351
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Endodontics
Volume33
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2007

Fingerprint

Apatites
Phosphates
Hydroxyapatites
X-Rays
Biocompatible Materials
Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy
Durapatite
Transmission Electron Microscopy
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Electrons
Calcium
calcium phosphate
mineral trioxide aggregate
amorphous calcium phosphate

Keywords

  • Amorphous calcium phosphate
  • carbonated apatite
  • white Portland cement
  • white mineral trioxide aggregate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Calcium Phosphate Phase Transformation Produced by the Interaction of the Portland Cement Component of White Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with a Phosphate-containing Fluid. / Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.; Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Loushine, Robert J.; Weller, R. Norman.

In: Journal of Endodontics, Vol. 33, No. 11, 01.11.2007, p. 1347-1351.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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