Central nervous system monitoring: What helps, what does not

D. H. Unwin, Cole A. Giller, T. A. Kopitnik

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Monitoring of CNS function in the intensive care unit can make a difference in the clinical outcome. No single technique addresses the multiple issues that may arise, especially in the polytrauma patient. Multimodality equipment combining assessment of cerebral blood flow, electrophysiologic parameters, and intracranial pressure when appropriate with cardiac and respiratory monitors are being developed. Pending their evaluation, selected use of intracranial pressure monitoring combined with EEG and transcutaneous Doppler ultrasound provides reliable immediate assessment and continued monitoring of CNS structures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)733-747
Number of pages15
JournalSurgical Clinics of North America
Volume71
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Intracranial Pressure
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Central Nervous System
Doppler Ultrasonography
Multiple Trauma
Intensive Care Units
Electroencephalography
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Unwin, D. H., Giller, C. A., & Kopitnik, T. A. (1991). Central nervous system monitoring: What helps, what does not. Surgical Clinics of North America, 71(4), 733-747.

Central nervous system monitoring : What helps, what does not. / Unwin, D. H.; Giller, Cole A.; Kopitnik, T. A.

In: Surgical Clinics of North America, Vol. 71, No. 4, 01.01.1991, p. 733-747.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Unwin, DH, Giller, CA & Kopitnik, TA 1991, 'Central nervous system monitoring: What helps, what does not', Surgical Clinics of North America, vol. 71, no. 4, pp. 733-747.
Unwin DH, Giller CA, Kopitnik TA. Central nervous system monitoring: What helps, what does not. Surgical Clinics of North America. 1991 Jan 1;71(4):733-747.
Unwin, D. H. ; Giller, Cole A. ; Kopitnik, T. A. / Central nervous system monitoring : What helps, what does not. In: Surgical Clinics of North America. 1991 ; Vol. 71, No. 4. pp. 733-747.
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