Characterization of the brachial artery shear stress following walking exercise

Jaume Padilla, Ryan A. Harris, Lawrence D. Rink, Janet P. Wallace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Habitual exercise provides repeated episodes of elevated vascular shear stress (SS), which may be a mechanism for repair of endothelial dysfunction in disease. Our aim was to determine the brachial artery SS during the 3-hour period following single bouts of low, moderate, and high-intensity walking exercise. In a randomized crossover design, 14 men walked for 45 minutes on a treadmill at 25%, 50% and 75% of VO2peak separated by 2-7 days. Using Doppler ultrasonography, brachial artery SS was assessed immediately after exercise and then hourly for 3 hours. High-intensity walking elicited greater (p < 0.05) post-exercise SS compared with low and moderate intensity. In addition, a 3 × 4 (intensity × time) ANOVA indicated an absence of interaction (p = 0.369) and a decline in post-exercise SS over time (p < 0.0001) which was abolished after 2 hours. Thus, we found that brachial artery SS is greatest following high-intensity walking and that the rate of decline in SS is similar across all walking intensities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-111
Number of pages7
JournalVascular Medicine
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2008

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Brachial Artery
Walking
Exercise
Doppler Ultrasonography
Cross-Over Studies
Blood Vessels
Analysis of Variance

Keywords

  • Doppler ultrasonography
  • Endothelial function
  • Exercise intensity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Characterization of the brachial artery shear stress following walking exercise. / Padilla, Jaume; Harris, Ryan A.; Rink, Lawrence D.; Wallace, Janet P.

In: Vascular Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 2, 15.07.2008, p. 105-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Padilla, Jaume ; Harris, Ryan A. ; Rink, Lawrence D. ; Wallace, Janet P. / Characterization of the brachial artery shear stress following walking exercise. In: Vascular Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 13, No. 2. pp. 105-111.
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