Commonly asked questions about nightguard vital bleaching.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

There are three basic classes of materials and techniques used for the bleaching of vital teeth. These include the in-office bleaching technique with 35 percent hydrogen peroxide, the Nightguard vital bleaching technique with 10 percent carbamide peroxide, and the over-the counter bleaching kits with three-to-six percent hydrogen peroxide. The most popular of these techniques is Nightguard vital bleaching also referred to as dentist-prescribed, home-applied bleaching. This article looks at the current status of the Nightguard vital bleaching technique, with a special emphasis on the clinical aspects of the treatment, along with the most commonly asked questions concerning the procedure. It would still appear that this form of dentist-prescribed, home-applied bleaching, when preceded by a proper examination and correct diagnosis, applied with a properly fitted prosthesis, and monitored as needed by a dentist, is as safe as other accepted dental procedures or commonly ingested foodstuffs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDental assistant (Chicago, Ill. : 1994)
Volume65
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Dentists
Hydrogen Peroxide
Tooth Bleaching
Prostheses and Implants
Tooth
Therapeutics

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Commonly asked questions about nightguard vital bleaching. / Haywood, Van Benjamine.

In: Dental assistant (Chicago, Ill. : 1994), Vol. 65, No. 2, 01.03.1996.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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