Comparison of parallel line skin test assay (PLST) and ELISA inhibition (EI) methods for determination of relative potency of polymerized grass and ragweed antigenic extracts

William K. Dolen, Brian T. Miller, Robert L. Ledoux, James M. Seltzer, Matthew B. Wiener, John C. Selner, Harold S. Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Relative potency estimates were performed by parallel line skin test assay (PLST) and ELISA inhibition methods for three polymerized allergen extracts (Bermuda grass, orchard grass, and a copolymer of short and giant ragweed) versus four unmodified RAST standardized reference extracts (Bermuda grass, orchard grass, and giant and short ragweed) in nine subjects. One subject experienced a systemic reaction, requiring treatment at the end of the PLST assay. Another subject had a systemic reaction during limited skin testing performed approximately 72 hours after completion of PLST. Relative potency values for the polymerized extracts obtained by PLST were much lower than those obtained by ELISA inhibition, but results were significantly (r = 0.95; p < 0.01) correlated. Because polymerized allergen extracts are designed to be hypoaller genie, a skin test assay may underestimate their potency relative to an unmodified reference extract.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)489-493
Number of pages5
JournalThe Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume81
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

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Ambrosia
Poaceae
Skin Tests
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Dactylis
Cynodon
Allergens
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Comparison of parallel line skin test assay (PLST) and ELISA inhibition (EI) methods for determination of relative potency of polymerized grass and ragweed antigenic extracts. / Dolen, William K.; Miller, Brian T.; Ledoux, Robert L.; Seltzer, James M.; Wiener, Matthew B.; Selner, John C.; Nelson, Harold S.

In: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 81, No. 2, 01.01.1988, p. 489-493.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dolen, William K. ; Miller, Brian T. ; Ledoux, Robert L. ; Seltzer, James M. ; Wiener, Matthew B. ; Selner, John C. ; Nelson, Harold S. / Comparison of parallel line skin test assay (PLST) and ELISA inhibition (EI) methods for determination of relative potency of polymerized grass and ragweed antigenic extracts. In: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 1988 ; Vol. 81, No. 2. pp. 489-493.
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