Completion pneumonectomy: Factors affecting operative mortality and cardiopulmonary morbidity

Daniel L. Miller, Claude Deschamps, Gregory D. Jenkins, Alain Bernard, Mark S. Allen, Peter C. Pairolero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

68 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. The purpose of this report is to analyze preoperative and perioperative factors affecting operative mortality and cardiopulmonary morbidity after a completion pneumonectomy. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed all patients who underwent completion pneumonectomy from January 1985 through September 1998 at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. Factors affecting operative mortality and postoperative morbidity and were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analysis. Results. There were 115 patients (73 men and 42 women), with a median age of 64 years (range, 12 to 83 years). Indication for pneumonectomy was benign disease in 57 patients (49.6%), lung cancer in 51 (44.3%) and metastatic disease in 7 (6.1%). There were 24 deaths (mortality 20.9%, 95% CI 13.9% to 29.4%). Mortality for patients undergoing completion pneumonectomy for benign disease, lung cancer, and metastatic cancer was 26.3%, 17.6%, and 0%, respectively (p = 0.24). Factors adversely affecting mortality with univariate analysis included advanced age (p = 0.004), preoperative corticosteriod use (p = 0.01), decreased preoperative diffusion capacity of lung to carbon monoxide (p = 0.01), intraoperative blood transfusion (p = 0.04), and excessive crystalloid infusion within the first 12 hours (p = 0.01) and 24 hours (0.03) postoperatively, respectively. Factors adversely affecting mortality with multivariate analysis included advanced age (p = 0.001), preoperative corticosteriod use (p = 0.002), and low preoperative hemoglobin (p = 0.02). Cardiopulmonary complications occurred in 72 patients (63.7%). Factors adversely affecting morbidity with univariate analysis included benign disease (p = 0.002), decreased preoperative diffusion capacity of lung to carbon monoxide (p = 0.04), bronchial stump reinforcement (p = 0.0001), and excessive crystalloid infusion within the first 12 hours (p = 0.006) and 24 hours (p = 0.02) postoperatively, respectively. Factors adversely affecting morbidity with multivariate analysis included advanced age (p = 0.005) and bronchial stump reinforcement (p = 0.001). Conclusions. Multiple factors adversely affect operative mortality and cardiopulmonary morbidity after completion pneumonectomy. Although completion pneumonectomy remains a high-risk procedure, especially for benign disease, it still should be considered a treatment option in selected patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)876-884
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume74
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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