Cost-effectiveness of community-based minigrants to increase physical activity in youth

Justin B. Moore, Vahe Heboyan, Theresa M. Oniffrey, Jason Brinkley, Sara M. Andrews, Mary Bea Kolbe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: American youth are insufficiently active, andminigrant programs have been developed to facilitate implementation of evidence-based interventions in communities. However, little is known about the cost-effectiveness of targeted minigrant programs for the implementation of physical activity (PA) promoting strategies for youth. Objective: To determine the cost-effectiveness of a minigrant program to increase PA among youth. Design: Twenty community grantees were pair-matched and randomized to receive funding at the beginning of year 1 (2010-2011) or year 2 (2011-2012) to implement interventions to increase PA in youth. Costs were calculated by examining financial reports provided by the granting organization and grantees. Setting: Twenty counties in North Carolina. Participants: A random sample of approximately 800 fourth- to eighth-grade youth (per year) from the approximately 6100 youth served by the 20 community-based interventions. Main Outcome Measure: Cost-effectiveness ratios (CERs) were calculated at the county and project levels to determine the cost per child-minute of moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) increased by wave. Analyses were conducted utilizing cost data from 20 community grantees and accelerometer-derived PA from the participating youth. Results: Of the 20 participating counties, 18 counties displayed increased youth MVPA between at least 2 waves of observation. Of those 18 counties, the CER (US dollars/MVPAminutes per day) ranged from $0.02 to $1.86 (n = 13) in intervention year 1, $0.02 to $6.19 (n = 15) in intervention year 2, and $0.02 to $0.58 (n = 17) across both years. Conclusion: If utilized to implement effectual behavior change strategies, minigrants can be a cost-effective means of increasing children's MVPA, with a low monetary cost per minute of MVPA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)364-369
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Public Health Management and Practice
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Cost-Benefit Analysis
Exercise
Costs and Cost Analysis
Observation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
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Keywords

  • community-engaged
  • cost-effectiveness
  • physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Cost-effectiveness of community-based minigrants to increase physical activity in youth. / Moore, Justin B.; Heboyan, Vahe; Oniffrey, Theresa M.; Brinkley, Jason; Andrews, Sara M.; Kolbe, Mary Bea.

In: Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, Vol. 23, No. 4, 01.01.2017, p. 364-369.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moore, Justin B. ; Heboyan, Vahe ; Oniffrey, Theresa M. ; Brinkley, Jason ; Andrews, Sara M. ; Kolbe, Mary Bea. / Cost-effectiveness of community-based minigrants to increase physical activity in youth. In: Journal of Public Health Management and Practice. 2017 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 364-369.
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