Defective restoration repair or replacement: An American Dental Association Clinical Evaluators Panel survey

Council on Scientific Affairs

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1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Clinicians often encounter defective restorations and are faced with the difficult decision of whether to repair the existing restoration or replace it. Methods: An electronic survey on repairing or replacing defective restorations was developed to assess how clinicians are making these decisions and the technical aspects considered when making a repair. E-mails containing the survey link were sent to the American Dental Association Clinical Evaluators (ACE) Panel on August 14, 2019, and the survey remained open for 2 weeks. Nonrespondents were sent reminders 1 week after deployment. Results: Approximately 4 of every 5 respondents repair defective restorations. The top 3 conditions for making these repairs were noncarious marginal defects (87%), partial loss or fracture of the restoration (79%), and crown margin repair due to carious lesions (73%). Among respondents who repair defective restorations, almost all repair direct resin composite (98%), whereas approximately one-third do not repair the other restorative materials (that is, amalgam, glass ionomer, and fractured indirect all-ceramic crowns). Resin composite is used most often to repair resin direct composite restorations, and likewise, glass ionomer is used most often to repair glass ionomer restorations. Only 54% of respondents use amalgam to repair amalgam restorations. Surface treatments varied among the 3 available restorations types. Conclusions: Many dentists are actively making restoration repairs, but choosing clinical scenarios to make these repairs is material dependent. Practical Implications: The repair of defective restorations is an acceptable and more conservative alternative than restoration replacement, and its success depends on proper case selection, material, and technique.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-330.e2
JournalJournal of the American Dental Association
Volume152
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

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