Depressive symptoms in mothers of infants identified as genetically at risk for type 1 diabetes

Korey K. Hood, Suzanne Bennett Johnson, Stacy K. Carmichael, Lori M.B. Laffel, Jin-Xiong She, Desmond A. Schatz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - This study describes maternal depression associated with newborn genetic screening for type 1 diabetes after risk notification. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Mothers of at-risk infants (n = 192), identified through newborn genetic screening as part of the Prospective Assessment of Newborns for Diabetes Autoimmunity study, were administered a structured telephone interview assessing maternal depressive symptoms 1 and 3.5 months after risk notification. Statistical analyses were conducted to examine predictors and correlates of maternal depressive symptoms. RESULTS - For the total sample, maternal depressive symptoms in response to infant risk status were not elevated at 1 and 3.5 months after risk notification. However, at the first interview, mothers from ethnic minority backgrounds (P < 0.002), with limited education (P < 0.001), and with postpartum depression symptomatology (P < 0.001) reported significantly more depressive symptoms in response to risk notification (r 2 = 0.354). At the second interview, postpartum depression symptomatology remained a powerful predictor of depressive symptoms in response to risk notification (P < 0.001). In addition, certain coping styles (wishful thinking, self-blame, and seeking social support) were associated with increased depressive symptoms. A history of major depression was a correlate of both postpartum depressive symptomatology (r = 0.26) and maternal depressive response to risk notification (r = 0.21). CONCLUSIONS - For the most part, mothers of infants genetically at risk for type 1 diabetes do not appear to evidence elevated depressive symptoms. This suggests that most mothers are resilient when notified of infant risk. However, certain maternal characteristics such as ethnic minority status, less than a high school education, postpartum depression symptomatology, a history of major depression, and certain coping strategies (wishful thinking, self-blame, and seeking social support) appear to be associated with a more difficult maternal response to the news of an infant's increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1898-1903
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume28
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2005

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Mothers
Depression
Postpartum Depression
Genetic Testing
Newborn Infant
Interviews
Social Support
Education
Autoimmunity
Postpartum Period
Research Design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Hood, K. K., Johnson, S. B., Carmichael, S. K., Laffel, L. M. B., She, J-X., & Schatz, D. A. (2005). Depressive symptoms in mothers of infants identified as genetically at risk for type 1 diabetes. Diabetes Care, 28(8), 1898-1903. https://doi.org/10.2337/diacare.28.8.1898

Depressive symptoms in mothers of infants identified as genetically at risk for type 1 diabetes. / Hood, Korey K.; Johnson, Suzanne Bennett; Carmichael, Stacy K.; Laffel, Lori M.B.; She, Jin-Xiong; Schatz, Desmond A.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 28, No. 8, 01.08.2005, p. 1898-1903.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hood, KK, Johnson, SB, Carmichael, SK, Laffel, LMB, She, J-X & Schatz, DA 2005, 'Depressive symptoms in mothers of infants identified as genetically at risk for type 1 diabetes', Diabetes Care, vol. 28, no. 8, pp. 1898-1903. https://doi.org/10.2337/diacare.28.8.1898
Hood, Korey K. ; Johnson, Suzanne Bennett ; Carmichael, Stacy K. ; Laffel, Lori M.B. ; She, Jin-Xiong ; Schatz, Desmond A. / Depressive symptoms in mothers of infants identified as genetically at risk for type 1 diabetes. In: Diabetes Care. 2005 ; Vol. 28, No. 8. pp. 1898-1903.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE - This study describes maternal depression associated with newborn genetic screening for type 1 diabetes after risk notification. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Mothers of at-risk infants (n = 192), identified through newborn genetic screening as part of the Prospective Assessment of Newborns for Diabetes Autoimmunity study, were administered a structured telephone interview assessing maternal depressive symptoms 1 and 3.5 months after risk notification. Statistical analyses were conducted to examine predictors and correlates of maternal depressive symptoms. RESULTS - For the total sample, maternal depressive symptoms in response to infant risk status were not elevated at 1 and 3.5 months after risk notification. However, at the first interview, mothers from ethnic minority backgrounds (P < 0.002), with limited education (P < 0.001), and with postpartum depression symptomatology (P < 0.001) reported significantly more depressive symptoms in response to risk notification (r 2 = 0.354). At the second interview, postpartum depression symptomatology remained a powerful predictor of depressive symptoms in response to risk notification (P < 0.001). In addition, certain coping styles (wishful thinking, self-blame, and seeking social support) were associated with increased depressive symptoms. A history of major depression was a correlate of both postpartum depressive symptomatology (r = 0.26) and maternal depressive response to risk notification (r = 0.21). CONCLUSIONS - For the most part, mothers of infants genetically at risk for type 1 diabetes do not appear to evidence elevated depressive symptoms. This suggests that most mothers are resilient when notified of infant risk. However, certain maternal characteristics such as ethnic minority status, less than a high school education, postpartum depression symptomatology, a history of major depression, and certain coping strategies (wishful thinking, self-blame, and seeking social support) appear to be associated with a more difficult maternal response to the news of an infant's increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes.",
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AB - OBJECTIVE - This study describes maternal depression associated with newborn genetic screening for type 1 diabetes after risk notification. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Mothers of at-risk infants (n = 192), identified through newborn genetic screening as part of the Prospective Assessment of Newborns for Diabetes Autoimmunity study, were administered a structured telephone interview assessing maternal depressive symptoms 1 and 3.5 months after risk notification. Statistical analyses were conducted to examine predictors and correlates of maternal depressive symptoms. RESULTS - For the total sample, maternal depressive symptoms in response to infant risk status were not elevated at 1 and 3.5 months after risk notification. However, at the first interview, mothers from ethnic minority backgrounds (P < 0.002), with limited education (P < 0.001), and with postpartum depression symptomatology (P < 0.001) reported significantly more depressive symptoms in response to risk notification (r 2 = 0.354). At the second interview, postpartum depression symptomatology remained a powerful predictor of depressive symptoms in response to risk notification (P < 0.001). In addition, certain coping styles (wishful thinking, self-blame, and seeking social support) were associated with increased depressive symptoms. A history of major depression was a correlate of both postpartum depressive symptomatology (r = 0.26) and maternal depressive response to risk notification (r = 0.21). CONCLUSIONS - For the most part, mothers of infants genetically at risk for type 1 diabetes do not appear to evidence elevated depressive symptoms. This suggests that most mothers are resilient when notified of infant risk. However, certain maternal characteristics such as ethnic minority status, less than a high school education, postpartum depression symptomatology, a history of major depression, and certain coping strategies (wishful thinking, self-blame, and seeking social support) appear to be associated with a more difficult maternal response to the news of an infant's increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes.

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