Design for Six Sigma (DFSS): A case study

Richard M. Franza, Satya S. Chakravorty

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper provides a demonstration of how Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) is utilized to design and engineer a new product. At the center of DFSS approach, is a five-step process, DMADV which is an acronym- Define, Measure, Analyze, Design, and Verify. We find that when the product is clearly identified in the Define stage, rest of the DMADV application proceeds in sequential and rational manner. However, if we find that if the product is not clearly defined in the Define stage, the rest of DMADV application proceeds in recursive and reflective manner. Over time, as DMADV approach is applied, the rate of progress dramatically decreases and the speed of product development becomes painfully slow, which was at times a very frustrating experience for the developer. We provide additional insights for implementing the DFSS approach to develop new products, which is important for both practicing managers and academicians. Most importantly, we conclude that DFSS appears to work well in new product development projects for evolutionary or derivative products, but not so well for revolutionary or breakthrough product projects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPICMET '07 - Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology - Proceedings Management of Converging Technologies
Pages1982-1989
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
Externally publishedYes
EventPICMET '07 - Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology - Management of Converging Technologies - Portland, OR, United States
Duration: Aug 5 2007Aug 9 2007

Other

OtherPICMET '07 - Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology - Management of Converging Technologies
CountryUnited States
CityPortland, OR
Period8/5/078/9/07

Fingerprint

Product development
Six sigma
Design for Six Sigma
Managers
Demonstrations
Derivatives
Engineers
New products
Development projects
Evolutionary
Developer
New product development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

Franza, R. M., & Chakravorty, S. S. (2007). Design for Six Sigma (DFSS): A case study. In PICMET '07 - Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology - Proceedings Management of Converging Technologies (pp. 1982-1989). [4349526] https://doi.org/10.1109/PICMET.2007.4349526

Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) : A case study. / Franza, Richard M.; Chakravorty, Satya S.

PICMET '07 - Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology - Proceedings Management of Converging Technologies. 2007. p. 1982-1989 4349526.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Franza, RM & Chakravorty, SS 2007, Design for Six Sigma (DFSS): A case study. in PICMET '07 - Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology - Proceedings Management of Converging Technologies., 4349526, pp. 1982-1989, PICMET '07 - Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology - Management of Converging Technologies, Portland, OR, United States, 8/5/07. https://doi.org/10.1109/PICMET.2007.4349526
Franza RM, Chakravorty SS. Design for Six Sigma (DFSS): A case study. In PICMET '07 - Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology - Proceedings Management of Converging Technologies. 2007. p. 1982-1989. 4349526 https://doi.org/10.1109/PICMET.2007.4349526
Franza, Richard M. ; Chakravorty, Satya S. / Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) : A case study. PICMET '07 - Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology - Proceedings Management of Converging Technologies. 2007. pp. 1982-1989
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