Development of a unidimensional composite measure of neuropsychological functioning in older cardiac surgery patients with good measurement precision

Richard N. Jones, James L. Rudolph, Sharon K. Inouye, Frances M. Yang, Tamara G. Fong, William P. Milberg, Douglas Tommet, Eran D. Metzger, L. Adrienne Cupples, Edward R. Marcantonio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this analysis was to develop a measure of neuropsychological performance for cardiac surgery and to assess its psychometric properties. Older patients (n = 210) underwent a neuropsychological battery using nine assessments. The number of factors was identified with variable reduction methods. Factor analysis methods based on item response theory were used to evaluate the measure. Modified parallel analysis supported a single factor, and the battery formed an internally consistent set (coefficient alpha =.82). The developed measure provided a reliable, continuous measure (reliability > .90) across a broad range of performance (-1.5 SDs to +1.0 SDs) with minimal ceiling and floor effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1041-1049
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume32
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Cardiac surgery
  • Cognition
  • Item response theory
  • Neuropsychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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    Jones, R. N., Rudolph, J. L., Inouye, S. K., Yang, F. M., Fong, T. G., Milberg, W. P., Tommet, D., Metzger, E. D., Cupples, L. A., & Marcantonio, E. R. (2010). Development of a unidimensional composite measure of neuropsychological functioning in older cardiac surgery patients with good measurement precision. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 32(10), 1041-1049. https://doi.org/10.1080/13803391003662728