Device-Based Movement Behaviors, Executive Function, and Academic Skills among African American Children with ADHD and Disruptive Behavior Disorders

María Enid Santiago-Rodríguez, Jared D. Ramer, David X. Marquez, Stacy L. Frazier, Catherine L. Davis, Eduardo E. Bustamante

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Physical activity (PA) has been identified as a promising intervention to improve executive function (EF) and reduce ADHD symptoms in children. Few African American children with ADHD and Disruptive Behavior Disorders (DBDs) from families with low incomes are represented in this literature. The purpose of this study is to test the relationships between PA and sedentary time (ST), and EF and academic skills among African American children with ADHD and DBD from low-income families. Methods: Children (n = 23, 6–13 years old) wore an ActiGraph for one week to measure PA and ST. EF was measured through parent report and direct neuropsychological tests. Academic skills were measured with the Curriculum-Based Measurement System. Bivariate correlations tested relationships between PA, ST, EF, and academic skills. Results: A significant correlation was observed between vigorous PA time and parent reported EF (r = −0.46, p = 0.040). Light PA and moderate PA were not related to EF or academic skills, and neither was ST. Conclusions: Vigorous PA may prove useful as an adjunct treatment to improve EF in African American children with ADHD and DBD in low-income neighborhoods. Research using experimental and longitudinal designs, and examining qualitative features of PA experiences, will be critical for understanding relationships between PA, academic skills, and EF in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number4032
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • accelerometry
  • health disparities
  • physical activity
  • poverty
  • sedentary time
  • social determinants of health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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