Effect of respite care training on the knowledge, attitude, and self-esteem of volunteer providers

Karen M. Robinson, Kay F. Kiesler, Stephen Warwick Looney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This pilot study explored the effect that respite care training had on volunteers' knowledge about Alzheimer's disease (AD), their attitudes toward the cognitively impaired, and their self-esteem. Volunteer respite providers (n = 52) were recruited and participated in four different day (seven-hour) respite care training programs. The sample was predominantly female (85 percent) and white (90 percent). Knowledge about AD increased significantly after respite training (p < .001), and attitudes toward someone who wanders were also significantly improved (p = .026). Overall, the findings support the immediate effectiveness of the respite training program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-382
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and other Dementias
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Caregiving
  • Respite care
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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