Esophageal candidoma in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

M. V. Bhalodia, K. J. Vega, J. DaCosta, B. W. Trotman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Oral thrush and esophagitis caused by Candida are common in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. We present the case of a 33-year-old man with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome who developed dysphagia during a hospitalization for pneumonia. Signs and symptoms were consistent with Candida esophagitis. Despite therapy with fluconazole, the patient's symptoms persisted. At upper endoscopy, a 1-cm, polypoid esophageal mass at 30 cm from the incisors and several other nodular lesions were observed; white plaques were noted throughout the esophagus. Biopsy specimens of the mass contained hyphal forms consistent with Candida species. Therapy with amphotericin B improved the patient's symptoms, and resolution of the mass was confirmed by repeat upper endoscopy. We believe this is the first case in the medical literature of a Candida mass (candidoma) causing dysphagia in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Candidoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of dysphagia in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection or immunosuppression due to other causes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-71
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the Association for Academic Minority Physicians : the official publication of the Association for Academic Minority Physicians
Volume9
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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