Ethnic differences and heritability of blood pressure circadian rhythmin African and European American youth and young adults

Yanyan Xu, Shaoyong Su, Michelle Brown, Harold Snieder, Gregory Harshfield, Xiaoling Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate whether blood pressure (BP) circadian rhythm in African Americans differed from that in European Americans. We further examined the genetic and/or environmental sources of variances of the BP circadian rhythm parameters and the extent to which they depend on ethnicity or sex. Method: Quantification of BP circadian rhythm was obtained using Fourier transformation from the ambulatory BP monitoring data of 760 individuals (mean age, 17.2±3.3; 322 twin pairs and 116 singletons; 351 African Americans). Results: BP circadian rhythm showed a clear difference by ethnic group with African Americans having a lower amplitude (P=1.5e-08), a lower percentage rhythm (P=2.8e-11), a higher MESOR (P=2.5e-05) and being more likely not to display circadian rhythm (P=0.002) or not in phase (P=0.003). Familial aggregation was identified for amplitude, percentage rhythm and acrophase with genetic factors and common environmental factors together accounting for 23 to 33% of the total variance of these BP circadian rhythm parameters. Unique environmental factors were the largest contributor explaining up to 67-77% of the total variance of these parameters. No sex or ethnicity difference in the variance components of BP circadian rhythm was observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that ethnic differences in BP circadian rhythm already exist in youth with African Americans having a dampened circadian rhythm and better BP circadian rhythm may be achieved by changes in environmental factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-170
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of hypertension
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acrophase
  • African Americans
  • Amplitude
  • Blood pressure
  • Circadian rhythm
  • Twin study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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