Evaluation of soft tissue attachments to a novel intra-abdominal prosthetic in a rabbit model

Charles J. Dolce, Jennifer E. Keller, Dimitrios Stefanidis, Kenneth C Walters, Jessica J. Heath, Amy L. Lincourt, H. James Norton, Kent W. Kercher, B. Todd Heniford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair requires placement of an intraperitoneal prosthetic. Composite mesh types have been developed to address the shortcomings of standard meshes. The authors evaluated the host reaction to intraperitoneal placement of a novel composite material. Materials and Methods. A comparison of an innovative polypropylene/polylactide composite mesh was made to Parietex Composite (PCO), Proceed, and DualMesh. Eighteen meshes per group were implanted on intact peritoneum in New Zealand White rabbits. The main outcome measures included the formation of visceral adhesions, adhesion tenacity, tensiometric measurements, and histological analysis. Evaluations of adhesions were made at 1, 4, and 16 weeks using a 2-mm minilaparoscopy. Results. There were no significant differences in the mean adhesion scores between the composite mesh types at week 1 (P =.15) and week 16 (P =.06). At 4 weeks, PCO had significantly fewer adhesions when compared with the other 3 mesh types (P =.02). Adhesion tenacity was also equivalent within the group at 16 weeks (P =.06). Tensiometry and histological analysis revealed no statistically significant differences between the mesh types. Conclusions. Four different composite mesh types had equivalent intra-abdominal soft tissue attachments in a rabbit model after a 16-week implantation period. PCO demonstrated the lowest mean adhesion score of each mesh type. Each mesh exhibited equivalent stiffness and energy to failure after explantation. The 4 composite mesh types demonstrated the successful formation of a neoperitoneum and comparable host biocompatibility as evidenced by similar degrees of inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)295-300
Number of pages6
JournalSurgical Innovation
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Rabbits
Ventral Hernia
Polypropylenes
Herniorrhaphy
Peritoneum
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Inflammation
parietex
poly(lactide)

Keywords

  • Proceed
  • adhesion
  • hernia
  • hernia repair
  • mesothelial
  • peritoneum
  • polypropylene
  • tissue engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Dolce, C. J., Keller, J. E., Stefanidis, D., Walters, K. C., Heath, J. J., Lincourt, A. L., ... Heniford, B. T. (2012). Evaluation of soft tissue attachments to a novel intra-abdominal prosthetic in a rabbit model. Surgical Innovation, 19(3), 295-300. https://doi.org/10.1177/1553350611429115

Evaluation of soft tissue attachments to a novel intra-abdominal prosthetic in a rabbit model. / Dolce, Charles J.; Keller, Jennifer E.; Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Walters, Kenneth C; Heath, Jessica J.; Lincourt, Amy L.; Norton, H. James; Kercher, Kent W.; Heniford, B. Todd.

In: Surgical Innovation, Vol. 19, No. 3, 01.09.2012, p. 295-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dolce, CJ, Keller, JE, Stefanidis, D, Walters, KC, Heath, JJ, Lincourt, AL, Norton, HJ, Kercher, KW & Heniford, BT 2012, 'Evaluation of soft tissue attachments to a novel intra-abdominal prosthetic in a rabbit model', Surgical Innovation, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 295-300. https://doi.org/10.1177/1553350611429115
Dolce, Charles J. ; Keller, Jennifer E. ; Stefanidis, Dimitrios ; Walters, Kenneth C ; Heath, Jessica J. ; Lincourt, Amy L. ; Norton, H. James ; Kercher, Kent W. ; Heniford, B. Todd. / Evaluation of soft tissue attachments to a novel intra-abdominal prosthetic in a rabbit model. In: Surgical Innovation. 2012 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 295-300.
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AU - Norton, H. James

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