Failure of cyclosporin-A to induce immunological unresponsiveness to nerve allografts

Andrew A. Zalewski, Adarsh K Gulati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although some allografts bearing major and minor transplantation antigens can survive after the cessation of immunosuppression with cyclosporin-A (Cy-A), nerve allografts do not. In an attempt to induce immunological unresponsiveness to nerve allografts, we used grafts containing only minor transplantation antigens and varied the duration of Cy-A therapy from 2 to 12 weeks. Our results demonstrated that nerve allografts survived in rats during Cy-A therapy, but when the drug administration ceased, the allografts were rejected. Other factors besides the degree of histoincompatibility and duration of Cy-A treatment must be involved in determining whether or not unresponsiveness develops to allografts after Cy-A withdrawal. We conclude that nerve allograft immunosuppression generated by Cy-A requires regular administration of the drug.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)659-663
Number of pages5
JournalExperimental Neurology
Volume83
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984
Externally publishedYes

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Cyclosporine
Allografts
Histocompatibility Antigens
Immunosuppression
Transplants
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

Failure of cyclosporin-A to induce immunological unresponsiveness to nerve allografts. / Zalewski, Andrew A.; Gulati, Adarsh K.

In: Experimental Neurology, Vol. 83, No. 3, 01.01.1984, p. 659-663.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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