Female, Black, and Unmarried Patients Are More Likely to Present With Metastatic Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

Zachary Klaassen, John M. DiBianco, Rita P. Jen, Austin J. Evans, Lael Reinstatler, Martha K. Terris, Rabii Madi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To identify the demographic and clinical factors associated with bladder urothelial carcinoma metastasis at diagnosis, patients diagnosed from 2004 to 2010 were identified in the SEER database. Factors associated with metastasis at diagnosis included female gender, black race, unmarried, unemployed, and foreign-born status. Clinicians should be aware of these potential health care disparities in order to improve early care. Background Although there are well-established risk factors for the diagnosis of bladder cancer, there is no consensus regarding risk factors for presentation of advanced or metastatic disease at diagnosis. The objective of this study was to identify the demographic and clinical factors associated with metastasis at diagnosis in patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma. Patients and Methods Patients diagnosed with bladder urothelial carcinoma from 2004 to 2010 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database (n = 108,417). The primary outcome was metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Demographic and socioeconomic variables were analyzed, and multivariable logistic regression models were performed to generate odds ratios (OR) for factors associated with metastasis at diagnosis. Results Of patients with bladder cancer, 3018 (2.8%) had metastasis at diagnosis and 105,399 (97.2%) had nonmetastatic disease. Patients with metastatic disease at diagnosis were more frequently female (29.6% vs. 23.6%, P < .001), black (9.4% vs. 5.0%, P < .001), and unmarried (44.1% vs. 32.5%, P < .001) compared to patients with nonmetastatic disease. On multivariable analysis, the following characteristics were confirmed to be independently associated with metastatic disease at diagnosis: female gender (vs. male, OR 1.21), black race (vs. white, OR 1.71), unmarried (vs. married, OR 1.46), unemployed (OR 1.02), and foreign-born status (OR 1.01). Conclusion Female gender, black race, unmarried, unemployed, and foreign-born status are independently associated with metastasis at diagnosis for bladder urothelial carcinoma. All clinicians should be aware of these potential health care disparities in order to involve social services and other support mechanisms in efforts to improve early care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e489-e492
JournalClinical Genitourinary Cancer
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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Urinary Bladder
Carcinoma
Odds Ratio
Neoplasm Metastasis
Healthcare Disparities
Demography
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Epidemiology
Logistic Models
Databases
Social Work
Consensus

Keywords

  • Bladder cancer
  • Marital status
  • Metastasis
  • Metastasis at diagnosis
  • SEER

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Urology

Cite this

Female, Black, and Unmarried Patients Are More Likely to Present With Metastatic Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma. / Klaassen, Zachary; DiBianco, John M.; Jen, Rita P.; Evans, Austin J.; Reinstatler, Lael; Terris, Martha K.; Madi, Rabii.

In: Clinical Genitourinary Cancer, Vol. 14, No. 5, 01.10.2016, p. e489-e492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Female, Black, and Unmarried Patients Are More Likely to Present With Metastatic Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma",
abstract = "To identify the demographic and clinical factors associated with bladder urothelial carcinoma metastasis at diagnosis, patients diagnosed from 2004 to 2010 were identified in the SEER database. Factors associated with metastasis at diagnosis included female gender, black race, unmarried, unemployed, and foreign-born status. Clinicians should be aware of these potential health care disparities in order to improve early care. Background Although there are well-established risk factors for the diagnosis of bladder cancer, there is no consensus regarding risk factors for presentation of advanced or metastatic disease at diagnosis. The objective of this study was to identify the demographic and clinical factors associated with metastasis at diagnosis in patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma. Patients and Methods Patients diagnosed with bladder urothelial carcinoma from 2004 to 2010 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database (n = 108,417). The primary outcome was metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Demographic and socioeconomic variables were analyzed, and multivariable logistic regression models were performed to generate odds ratios (OR) for factors associated with metastasis at diagnosis. Results Of patients with bladder cancer, 3018 (2.8{\%}) had metastasis at diagnosis and 105,399 (97.2{\%}) had nonmetastatic disease. Patients with metastatic disease at diagnosis were more frequently female (29.6{\%} vs. 23.6{\%}, P < .001), black (9.4{\%} vs. 5.0{\%}, P < .001), and unmarried (44.1{\%} vs. 32.5{\%}, P < .001) compared to patients with nonmetastatic disease. On multivariable analysis, the following characteristics were confirmed to be independently associated with metastatic disease at diagnosis: female gender (vs. male, OR 1.21), black race (vs. white, OR 1.71), unmarried (vs. married, OR 1.46), unemployed (OR 1.02), and foreign-born status (OR 1.01). Conclusion Female gender, black race, unmarried, unemployed, and foreign-born status are independently associated with metastasis at diagnosis for bladder urothelial carcinoma. All clinicians should be aware of these potential health care disparities in order to involve social services and other support mechanisms in efforts to improve early care.",
keywords = "Bladder cancer, Marital status, Metastasis, Metastasis at diagnosis, SEER",
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AU - Evans, Austin J.

AU - Reinstatler, Lael

AU - Terris, Martha K.

AU - Madi, Rabii

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N2 - To identify the demographic and clinical factors associated with bladder urothelial carcinoma metastasis at diagnosis, patients diagnosed from 2004 to 2010 were identified in the SEER database. Factors associated with metastasis at diagnosis included female gender, black race, unmarried, unemployed, and foreign-born status. Clinicians should be aware of these potential health care disparities in order to improve early care. Background Although there are well-established risk factors for the diagnosis of bladder cancer, there is no consensus regarding risk factors for presentation of advanced or metastatic disease at diagnosis. The objective of this study was to identify the demographic and clinical factors associated with metastasis at diagnosis in patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma. Patients and Methods Patients diagnosed with bladder urothelial carcinoma from 2004 to 2010 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database (n = 108,417). The primary outcome was metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Demographic and socioeconomic variables were analyzed, and multivariable logistic regression models were performed to generate odds ratios (OR) for factors associated with metastasis at diagnosis. Results Of patients with bladder cancer, 3018 (2.8%) had metastasis at diagnosis and 105,399 (97.2%) had nonmetastatic disease. Patients with metastatic disease at diagnosis were more frequently female (29.6% vs. 23.6%, P < .001), black (9.4% vs. 5.0%, P < .001), and unmarried (44.1% vs. 32.5%, P < .001) compared to patients with nonmetastatic disease. On multivariable analysis, the following characteristics were confirmed to be independently associated with metastatic disease at diagnosis: female gender (vs. male, OR 1.21), black race (vs. white, OR 1.71), unmarried (vs. married, OR 1.46), unemployed (OR 1.02), and foreign-born status (OR 1.01). Conclusion Female gender, black race, unmarried, unemployed, and foreign-born status are independently associated with metastasis at diagnosis for bladder urothelial carcinoma. All clinicians should be aware of these potential health care disparities in order to involve social services and other support mechanisms in efforts to improve early care.

AB - To identify the demographic and clinical factors associated with bladder urothelial carcinoma metastasis at diagnosis, patients diagnosed from 2004 to 2010 were identified in the SEER database. Factors associated with metastasis at diagnosis included female gender, black race, unmarried, unemployed, and foreign-born status. Clinicians should be aware of these potential health care disparities in order to improve early care. Background Although there are well-established risk factors for the diagnosis of bladder cancer, there is no consensus regarding risk factors for presentation of advanced or metastatic disease at diagnosis. The objective of this study was to identify the demographic and clinical factors associated with metastasis at diagnosis in patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma. Patients and Methods Patients diagnosed with bladder urothelial carcinoma from 2004 to 2010 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database (n = 108,417). The primary outcome was metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Demographic and socioeconomic variables were analyzed, and multivariable logistic regression models were performed to generate odds ratios (OR) for factors associated with metastasis at diagnosis. Results Of patients with bladder cancer, 3018 (2.8%) had metastasis at diagnosis and 105,399 (97.2%) had nonmetastatic disease. Patients with metastatic disease at diagnosis were more frequently female (29.6% vs. 23.6%, P < .001), black (9.4% vs. 5.0%, P < .001), and unmarried (44.1% vs. 32.5%, P < .001) compared to patients with nonmetastatic disease. On multivariable analysis, the following characteristics were confirmed to be independently associated with metastatic disease at diagnosis: female gender (vs. male, OR 1.21), black race (vs. white, OR 1.71), unmarried (vs. married, OR 1.46), unemployed (OR 1.02), and foreign-born status (OR 1.01). Conclusion Female gender, black race, unmarried, unemployed, and foreign-born status are independently associated with metastasis at diagnosis for bladder urothelial carcinoma. All clinicians should be aware of these potential health care disparities in order to involve social services and other support mechanisms in efforts to improve early care.

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