Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography studies in diagnosis and staging of clinically organ-confined prostate cancer

I. Jenna Liu, Muhammad Behzad Zafar, Yen Han Lai, George M. Segall, Martha K. Terris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

213 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. To determine the value of 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) studies in the evaluation of patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. This imaging method has previously found little usefulness in localized prostate tumors because of excretion of the isotope into the urine, masking any lower urinary tract lesions. We evaluated this imaging modality using hydration, furosemide, and bladder emptying before the procedure to evacuate the nonspecific isotope in the urine. Methods. FDG PET scans were performed on 24 patients diagnosed with clinically organ-confined prostate cancer. No patient had received any prior treatments for the cancer. FDG PET scans were performed 1 hour after injection of 15 mCi of F-18 deoxyglucose. Patients were scanned from the base of the skull through the inguinal region (including the pelvis). Additional signal attenuation-corrected images of the inguinal region were acquired 30 minutes after intravenous injection of 40 mg of furosemide. The final diagnosis was made by histologic examination, correlative imaging studies, and/or clinical follow-up. Results. FDG PET studies were negative in 23 of the 24 organ-confined prostate cancers and the study was only faintly positive in 1 tumor (4.0% sensitivity). Conclusions. FDG PET is not a useful test in the evaluation of clinically organ-confined prostate cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)108-111
Number of pages4
JournalUrology
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 3 2001
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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