Gender differences in diastolic function among youth

G. K. Kapuku, H. C. Davis, N. Shah, A. M. McMillan, G. A. Harshfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Youth were studied to determine the influence of gender on diastolic function, which has been shown to express abnormalities early in the course of congestive heart failure. Methods: The study participants were 121 normotensive individuals (53 girls, 68 boys) ages 14 to 18 years. Demographics, hemodynamics, and Doppler-derived indices of diastolic function were collected. Dependent measures of diastolic function were the ratio of early (E) to late (A) peak filling velocities and the isovolumetric relaxation time (IVRT). Results: The girls had a higher relative wall thickness (RWT) (36.58% ± 4.59% vs 34.60% ± 4.01%; p < 0.02), higher A (48.40 ± 8.47 cm/s vs 42.36 ± 10.43 cm/s; p < 0.001), a lower E/A ratio (1.96 ± 0.40 vs 2.38 ± 0.68; p < 0.01), and a shorter IVRT (51.80 ± 11.14 ms vs 59.00 ± 14.36 ms; p < 0.01) than the boys. The differences in deceleration time were not significant (181.30 ± 81.33 ms vs 170.30 ± 31.06 ms). Hierarchical stepwise regression analysis predicting E/A ratio found gender (male > female) to be the best predictor (R 2 = 0.09) followed by heart rate (R 2 increase = 0.07; total R 2 = 0.15; p < 0.01) and by RWT (R 2 increase = 0.05; total R 2 = 0.21; p < 0.015). For IVRT prediction, gender (male > female) was the best predictor (R 2 = 0.11), followed by total peripheral resistance (R 2 increase = 0.06; total R 2 = 0.17; p < 0.017). Conclusion: The study data indicate that gender differences in diastolic function exist already in youth. Girls show a higher RWT, a lower E/A ratio, and a shorter IVRT. The implications of these differences for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality of the two genders require attention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-107
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Cardiology
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

Fingerprint

Vascular Resistance
Heart Failure
Heart Rate
Hemodynamics
Demography
Morbidity
Mortality

Keywords

  • Diastolic function
  • Gender
  • Sodium excretion
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Gender differences in diastolic function among youth. / Kapuku, G. K.; Davis, H. C.; Shah, N.; McMillan, A. M.; Harshfield, G. A.

In: Pediatric Cardiology, Vol. 29, No. 1, 01.01.2008, p. 102-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kapuku, G. K. ; Davis, H. C. ; Shah, N. ; McMillan, A. M. ; Harshfield, G. A. / Gender differences in diastolic function among youth. In: Pediatric Cardiology. 2008 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 102-107.
@article{98cc257fb5c6451484eac01b7db7d2b9,
title = "Gender differences in diastolic function among youth",
abstract = "Background: Youth were studied to determine the influence of gender on diastolic function, which has been shown to express abnormalities early in the course of congestive heart failure. Methods: The study participants were 121 normotensive individuals (53 girls, 68 boys) ages 14 to 18 years. Demographics, hemodynamics, and Doppler-derived indices of diastolic function were collected. Dependent measures of diastolic function were the ratio of early (E) to late (A) peak filling velocities and the isovolumetric relaxation time (IVRT). Results: The girls had a higher relative wall thickness (RWT) (36.58{\%} ± 4.59{\%} vs 34.60{\%} ± 4.01{\%}; p < 0.02), higher A (48.40 ± 8.47 cm/s vs 42.36 ± 10.43 cm/s; p < 0.001), a lower E/A ratio (1.96 ± 0.40 vs 2.38 ± 0.68; p < 0.01), and a shorter IVRT (51.80 ± 11.14 ms vs 59.00 ± 14.36 ms; p < 0.01) than the boys. The differences in deceleration time were not significant (181.30 ± 81.33 ms vs 170.30 ± 31.06 ms). Hierarchical stepwise regression analysis predicting E/A ratio found gender (male > female) to be the best predictor (R 2 = 0.09) followed by heart rate (R 2 increase = 0.07; total R 2 = 0.15; p < 0.01) and by RWT (R 2 increase = 0.05; total R 2 = 0.21; p < 0.015). For IVRT prediction, gender (male > female) was the best predictor (R 2 = 0.11), followed by total peripheral resistance (R 2 increase = 0.06; total R 2 = 0.17; p < 0.017). Conclusion: The study data indicate that gender differences in diastolic function exist already in youth. Girls show a higher RWT, a lower E/A ratio, and a shorter IVRT. The implications of these differences for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality of the two genders require attention.",
keywords = "Diastolic function, Gender, Sodium excretion, Youth",
author = "Kapuku, {G. K.} and Davis, {H. C.} and N. Shah and McMillan, {A. M.} and Harshfield, {G. A.}",
year = "2008",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00246-007-9093-z",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "102--107",
journal = "Pediatric Cardiology",
issn = "0172-0643",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gender differences in diastolic function among youth

AU - Kapuku, G. K.

AU - Davis, H. C.

AU - Shah, N.

AU - McMillan, A. M.

AU - Harshfield, G. A.

PY - 2008/1/1

Y1 - 2008/1/1

N2 - Background: Youth were studied to determine the influence of gender on diastolic function, which has been shown to express abnormalities early in the course of congestive heart failure. Methods: The study participants were 121 normotensive individuals (53 girls, 68 boys) ages 14 to 18 years. Demographics, hemodynamics, and Doppler-derived indices of diastolic function were collected. Dependent measures of diastolic function were the ratio of early (E) to late (A) peak filling velocities and the isovolumetric relaxation time (IVRT). Results: The girls had a higher relative wall thickness (RWT) (36.58% ± 4.59% vs 34.60% ± 4.01%; p < 0.02), higher A (48.40 ± 8.47 cm/s vs 42.36 ± 10.43 cm/s; p < 0.001), a lower E/A ratio (1.96 ± 0.40 vs 2.38 ± 0.68; p < 0.01), and a shorter IVRT (51.80 ± 11.14 ms vs 59.00 ± 14.36 ms; p < 0.01) than the boys. The differences in deceleration time were not significant (181.30 ± 81.33 ms vs 170.30 ± 31.06 ms). Hierarchical stepwise regression analysis predicting E/A ratio found gender (male > female) to be the best predictor (R 2 = 0.09) followed by heart rate (R 2 increase = 0.07; total R 2 = 0.15; p < 0.01) and by RWT (R 2 increase = 0.05; total R 2 = 0.21; p < 0.015). For IVRT prediction, gender (male > female) was the best predictor (R 2 = 0.11), followed by total peripheral resistance (R 2 increase = 0.06; total R 2 = 0.17; p < 0.017). Conclusion: The study data indicate that gender differences in diastolic function exist already in youth. Girls show a higher RWT, a lower E/A ratio, and a shorter IVRT. The implications of these differences for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality of the two genders require attention.

AB - Background: Youth were studied to determine the influence of gender on diastolic function, which has been shown to express abnormalities early in the course of congestive heart failure. Methods: The study participants were 121 normotensive individuals (53 girls, 68 boys) ages 14 to 18 years. Demographics, hemodynamics, and Doppler-derived indices of diastolic function were collected. Dependent measures of diastolic function were the ratio of early (E) to late (A) peak filling velocities and the isovolumetric relaxation time (IVRT). Results: The girls had a higher relative wall thickness (RWT) (36.58% ± 4.59% vs 34.60% ± 4.01%; p < 0.02), higher A (48.40 ± 8.47 cm/s vs 42.36 ± 10.43 cm/s; p < 0.001), a lower E/A ratio (1.96 ± 0.40 vs 2.38 ± 0.68; p < 0.01), and a shorter IVRT (51.80 ± 11.14 ms vs 59.00 ± 14.36 ms; p < 0.01) than the boys. The differences in deceleration time were not significant (181.30 ± 81.33 ms vs 170.30 ± 31.06 ms). Hierarchical stepwise regression analysis predicting E/A ratio found gender (male > female) to be the best predictor (R 2 = 0.09) followed by heart rate (R 2 increase = 0.07; total R 2 = 0.15; p < 0.01) and by RWT (R 2 increase = 0.05; total R 2 = 0.21; p < 0.015). For IVRT prediction, gender (male > female) was the best predictor (R 2 = 0.11), followed by total peripheral resistance (R 2 increase = 0.06; total R 2 = 0.17; p < 0.017). Conclusion: The study data indicate that gender differences in diastolic function exist already in youth. Girls show a higher RWT, a lower E/A ratio, and a shorter IVRT. The implications of these differences for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality of the two genders require attention.

KW - Diastolic function

KW - Gender

KW - Sodium excretion

KW - Youth

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=38349154379&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=38349154379&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00246-007-9093-z

DO - 10.1007/s00246-007-9093-z

M3 - Article

C2 - 17899243

AN - SCOPUS:38349154379

VL - 29

SP - 102

EP - 107

JO - Pediatric Cardiology

JF - Pediatric Cardiology

SN - 0172-0643

IS - 1

ER -